Reading Club

14 July 2021

Thanks to everyone who attended the latest JLDHE Reading Club, where we discussed Nathalie Sheridan’s (Tasler) article on creative teaching in higher education. Thank you to Nathalie for joining us and being so willing / happy to answer all our questions! We were a small group this time around, which meant we were able get into really interesting and detailed discussions about Nathalie’s paper.

We had interesting discussions around how Nathalie conducted her research. We were all interested in her use of Guerrilla Research Tactics (GRT) and how this added valuable insights into Nathalie’s evaluation / findings. Lee prompted an interesting discussion around how we often (over?) contextualise academic literacies within specific disciplines and subjects and related this to Nathalie’s de-contextualise / re-contextualise model of creative teaching. Our final thoughts, prompted by one of the paper’s case studies and Joe’s experience in his own role, turned to creative ways to provide students with feedback on their work. We shared our thoughts on audio feedback and links to other research that we thought would be useful for everyone.

For anyone who wanted to attend this event but couldn’t, Nathalie is happy to answer any questions or discuss your thoughts on her paper. You also follow her on Twitter

Our next group meeting will be Wednesday 8th September at 5:30pm.

We will be in touch in advance with a selection of JLDHE articles for you to vote from. We will then confirm the piece with the most votes (!) and share the zoom link a week before the event. Please contact Jenny if you'd like to be included in the email.

 

12 May 2021

Thanks to those who were able to come along to the launch of the JLDHE Reading Club, where we discussed Sam King’s article on metadiscourse. Thanks also to Sam for attending, engaging in the discussion and answering our questions so generously and comprehensively! We were delighted to be joined by colleagues in LD from across the UK, Ireland and Canada – which made for a rich, lively discussion.

Interesting questions were raised by attendees on metadiscourse and the different ways in which we teach it (or not) at our own institutions. Variations in disciplinary approaches to signposting in assignments was something we confronted, as well as the effects it may have on non-expert “experiences” of a text. The intersections with EAP work, highlighted by Sam, Ian and others, also seemed to be of considerable interest to us all. Some of the takeaways from Sam’s piece seem to have been the progression that students make in the “academic discourse community” when LD-ers provide instruction in metadiscourse, even if it does not appear to result in higher marks at levels 4 and 5 in certain disciplinary areas. As Jim and others highlighted, there is also the question as to whether, in teaching metadiscourse and its use, we are seeking to help students to “make disciplinary meanings”, or teaching them to write well.

Our next group meeting will be Wednesday 14th July at 5:30pm.

We will be in touch in advance with a selection of JLDHE articles for you to vote from. We will then confirm the piece with the most votes (!) and share the zoom link a week before the event. Please contact Jenny if you'd like to be included in the email.