Remote learning might be new, but how we can learn best is not

Authors

  • Carrie Hanson McGill University
  • Alexander Liepins McGill University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47408/jldhe.vi22.720

Keywords:

learning strategies, skills development, student success, remote learning, metacognition, Covid-19

References

Major, C. H. (2015) Teaching online: a guide to theory, research, and practice. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

McGuire, S. Y. (2015) Teach students how to learn: strategies you can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. Sterling, Virginia: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

Wiggins, G. P. and McTighe, J. (2006) Understanding by design. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Education.

Winne, P. H. and Hadwin, A. F. (1998) ‘Studying as self regulated learning’, in Hacker, D. J., Dunlosky, J. and Graesser, A. C. (eds.) Metacognition in educational theory and practice. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum Associates, pp. 277-304.

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Published

2021-10-13

How to Cite

Hanson, C. and Liepins, A. (2021) “Remote learning might be new, but how we can learn best is not”, Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education, (22). doi: 10.47408/jldhe.vi22.720.

Issue

Section

Adapting core features of learning development: skills and writing support