https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/issue/feed Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education 2021-11-03T10:48:57-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk Open Journal Systems <p>The Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education is an open access peer-reviewed bi-annual journal that provides a forum for researchers writing about educational practices and rethinking theoretical and methodological approaches to learning in higher education. We invite contributions in the form of research papers, case studies, opinion pieces, book reviews, and brief communications, but also welcome visual submissions including poster presentations as well as audios and videos. In addition to our regular editions, we release special issues on topics reflecting current debates in the field.</p> <p>We are indexed by the&nbsp;<a href="https://doaj.org/toc/2227-6068?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22terms%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%5B%222227-6068%22%5D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D">DOAJ</a> (Directory of Open Access Journals) and Google Scholar.&nbsp;</p> https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/850 Compendium of Innovative Practice: Learning Development in a Time of Disruption 2021-10-31T15:56:25-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-29T07:02:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/851 Section Editorial: Responding to the needs of doctoral researchers 2021-10-31T15:56:35-07:00 Nicola Grayson nicola.grayson@manchester.ac.uk 2021-10-29T06:54:43-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/840 Section Editorial: Fostering student engagement 2021-10-31T15:56:46-07:00 Gita Sedghi g.sedghi@liverpool.ac.uk 2021-10-29T05:50:12-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/841 Section Editorial: Supporting institutional change 2021-10-31T15:56:58-07:00 Cathy Malone c.malone@mdx.ac.uk 2021-10-29T05:46:20-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/844 Section Editorial: Supporting staff through change 2021-10-31T15:57:08-07:00 Cathy Malone c.malone@mdx.ac.uk 2021-10-29T05:34:19-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/845 Section Editorial: Using technology to enhance online learning 2021-10-31T15:57:19-07:00 Cathy Malone c.malone@mdx.ac.uk 2021-10-29T05:29:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/669 How it adds up: dual reflections on the online engagement of one cohort of accounting students 2021-10-31T15:57:31-07:00 Vicky Collins v.collins@reading.ac.uk Sue Blackett s.blackett@henley.ac.uk 2021-10-29T03:23:07-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/799 Using Padlet as a Pedagogical Tool 2021-10-31T15:57:42-07:00 Ameera Ali ameera.samara.ali@gmail.com 2021-10-29T03:15:52-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/847 Section Editorial: Prioritising wellbeing through community and connection 2021-10-31T15:57:53-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-29T02:56:55-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/848 Section Editorial: Embodied learning in an online world 2021-10-31T15:58:05-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-29T02:53:20-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/849 Section Editorial: Innovations in teaching and course delivery 2021-10-31T15:58:16-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-29T02:49:46-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/842 Section Editorial: Students as partners in course delivery 2021-10-31T15:58:26-07:00 Gita Sedghi g.sedghi@liverpool.ac.uk 2021-10-28T10:33:12-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/843 Section Editorial: Adapting assessment and feedback strategies 2021-10-31T15:58:38-07:00 Gita Sedghi g.sedghi@liverpool.ac.uk 2021-10-28T10:28:36-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/846 Section Editorial: Adapting core features of learning development: skills and writing support 2021-10-31T15:58:50-07:00 Gita Sedghi g.sedghi@liverpool.ac.uk 2021-10-28T10:17:05-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/721 Inwards, together: an inner-resourcing U-turn 2021-10-31T15:59:01-07:00 Deena Shaffer deena.shaffer@ryerson.ca Diana Brecher dbrecher@ryerson.ca 2021-10-28T05:02:24-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/670 TALON: Shaping the future of online education through connectivity 2021-10-31T15:59:14-07:00 Sandra Abegglen sandra.abegglen@ucalgary.ca Fabian Neuhaus fabian.neuhaus@ucalgary.ca 2021-10-28T03:42:05-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/830 Challenges of running online exams and preventing academic dishonesty during the Covid-19 pandemic 2021-11-03T09:04:45-07:00 Luke Lu Chang Peh lukepehlc@suss.edu.sg Sabina Cerimagic sabina.cerimagic@sydney.edu.au Sheila Conejos sheilaconejos@suss.edu.sg 2021-10-28T02:15:57-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/682 Community-building through collaborative peer-generated formative assessment: enhancing attainment and assessment literacy 2021-11-03T09:04:48-07:00 Emma Roberts emma.roberts@chester.ac.uk 2021-10-28T01:41:56-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/707 Video feedback in English for Academic Purposes: building connections with international students while learning online 2021-11-03T09:04:51-07:00 Jade Kimberley jade.kimberley@kaplan.com Chiara Matthews chiara.matthews@kaplan.com Vanessa Smith vanessa.smith@kaplan.com Jo Leech jo.leech@kaplan.com 2021-10-28T01:33:58-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/676 Building a learning community through collaborative, online assessment preparation 2021-11-03T09:04:53-07:00 Ellie Davison edavison@lincoln.ac.uk 2021-10-28T01:03:19-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/728 Authentic assessment during COVID-19: an Australian postgraduate computing degree program example 2021-11-03T09:04:54-07:00 Rabiul Hasan rabiul.hasan@sydney.edu.au Sabina Cerimagic sabina.cerimagic@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-28T00:58:12-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/788 Maintaining quality assessment practices under emergency remote online conditions 2021-11-03T09:06:53-07:00 Shalini Dukhan shalini.dukhan2@wits.ac.za 2021-10-28T00:55:05-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/708 Providing affective and supportive video feedback in a multidisciplinary unit during the pandemic 2021-11-03T09:06:55-07:00 Abdul Razeed abdul.razeed@sydney.edu.au Pat Norman pat.norman@sydney.edu.au Kristna Gurney kristna.gurney@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-28T00:47:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/690 A holistic approach to authentic and engaging assessment during the Covid-19 pandemic: an Australian case study 2021-11-03T09:06:58-07:00 Sabina Cerimagic sabina.cerimagic@sydney.edu.au M. Rabiul Hasan rabiul.hasan@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-28T00:35:52-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/745 Building a values-based community of practice in Nursing Sciences during the Covid-19 pandemic 2021-11-03T09:07:01-07:00 Debbie Holley dholley@bournemouth.ac.uk Anne Quinney aquinney@bournemouth.ac.uk John Moran jmoran@bournemouth.ac.uk 2021-10-28T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/793 A partnership approach to pandemic policy: building student confidence in the wake of Covid-19 2021-11-03T09:08:52-07:00 Cara Chittenden Cara.Chittenden@thesu.org Penny Dinh Penny.Dinh@exeterguild.com Beverley Hawkins B.C.Hawkins@exeter.ac.uk Rob Freathy R.J.K.Freathy@exeter.ac.uk Pete Vukusic P.Vukusic@exeter.ac.uk 2021-10-27T12:50:30-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/756 Co-creating quality: moving HE forwards in partnership with students 2021-11-03T09:08:55-07:00 Lisa Harris l.j.harris@exeter.ac.uk Sarah Dyer s.dyer@exeter.ac.uk 2021-10-27T12:44:40-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/769 Facilitating student engagement in online discussions through self-organisation 2021-11-03T09:08:57-07:00 Elena Oncevska Ager elena.oncevska@flf.ukim.edu.mk 2021-10-27T12:40:34-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/794 Moving an English course online in four days: better safe 2021-11-03T09:09:01-07:00 Tatiana Golechkova tgolechkova@nes.ru 2021-10-27T10:50:31-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/681 Democracy in action: students as design partners 2021-11-03T09:09:04-07:00 Andrea Todd andrea.todd@chester.ac.uk 2021-10-27T10:42:43-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/702 Learning to learn online: creating an open-access learning development platform 2021-11-03T09:09:07-07:00 Jodie Calleja jodie.calleja@canterbury.ac.uk Silvina Bishopp-Martin silvina.bishopp-martin@canterbury.ac.uk 2021-10-27T09:32:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/673 Hybrid teaching workshops: upskilling educators to deliver hybrid classes 2021-11-03T09:09:10-07:00 Sandris Zeivots sandris.zeivots@sydney.edu.au Courtney Shalavin courtney.shalavin@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-27T09:18:32-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/743 From emergency remote teaching to hybrid NUflex: a collaborative approach to developing faculty into learning designers 2021-11-03T09:09:13-07:00 Rachel Plews r.plews@northeastern.edu Michael Sweet m.sweet@northeastern.edu Lindsey Sudbury l.sudbury@northeastern.edu Will Malan w.malan@northeastern.edu Clair Waterbury c.waterbury@northeastern.edu Jesse Savage j.savage@northeastern.edu Erin Provensal e.provensal@northeastern.edu Kelsey Rose-Sinclair athelp@northeastern.edu Maximo Chavez m.chavez@northeastern.edu 2021-10-27T09:08:36-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/712 Digital capabilities: From niche to normal 2021-11-03T09:09:16-07:00 Andy White andy.white@cumbria.ac.uk Amanda Chapman amanda.chapman@cumbria.ac.uk Isabel Lucas isabel.lucas@cumbria.ac.uk 2021-10-27T08:58:22-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/836 The CHAMELEON approach to change: adapting to new educational conditions 2021-11-03T09:09:20-07:00 Laura Davies laura.davies@dukekunshan.edu.cn Joseph Davies Joseph.Davies@dukekunshan.edu.cn 2021-10-27T08:51:32-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/695 Sell them what they want; give them what they need: managing tensions and competing expectations in live online lecturer development workshops 2021-11-03T09:09:25-07:00 Martin Compton martin.compton@ucl.ac.uk 2021-10-27T08:45:17-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/789 Transitioning from emergency remote teaching to quality online delivery: an Irish professional development perspective 2021-11-03T09:09:29-07:00 Darina Slattery darinaslattery@gmail.com 2021-10-27T08:39:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/800 Instructional design for live online teaching: using mnemonics to support a UDL-centred approach 2021-11-03T09:09:34-07:00 Kevin Merry drkevinl@icloud.com 2021-10-27T07:40:07-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/692 CLaS light touch project: scaling up educational co-design process 2021-11-03T09:09:37-07:00 Dewa Wardak dewa.wardak@sydney.edu.au Sandris Zeivots sandris.zeivots@sydney.edu.au Andrew Cram andrew.cram@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-27T07:33:30-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/787 Challenges, chances and a café: connecting with refugee English language learners 2021-11-03T09:09:41-07:00 Susan Stetson-Tiligadas tiligadas@acg.edu Jane Mandalios jmandalios@acg.edu 2021-10-27T06:44:48-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/780 Engaging students in online workshops Using Articulate Rise 2021-11-03T09:09:45-07:00 Zara Hooley zara.hooley@dmu.ac.uk Emily Forster emily.forster@dmu.ac.uk Andrew Browne andrew.browne@dmu.ac.uk 2021-10-27T06:35:51-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/689 Private online channels and student-centred interaction 2021-11-03T09:09:48-07:00 James McMenamin jamesmcmenamin@fhnw.ch Marie-Thérèse Rudolf von Rohr marietherese.rudolfvonrohr@fhnw.ch 2021-10-27T06:17:29-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/698 Building a study community through podcasts during Covid-19 2021-11-03T09:09:53-07:00 Julia Bohlmann Julia.Bohlmann@glasgow.ac.uk Micky Ross Micky.Ross@glasgow.ac.uk 2021-10-27T05:45:23-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/791 Rapid re-design of a postgraduate taught module for asynchronous delivery on the FutureLearn platform 2021-11-03T09:09:58-07:00 Ikedinachi Ogamba ikedinachi.ogamba@coventry.ac.uk 2021-10-27T05:31:49-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/790 Learning to stream and streaming to learn 2021-11-03T09:10:04-07:00 Stevie Prickett stevie.prickett@hotmail.co.uk 2021-10-27T05:26:48-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/671 Developing online content to support students: the Remote Learning SkillsGuide 2021-11-03T09:10:12-07:00 Lee Fallin Lee.fallin@hull.ac.uk 2021-10-27T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/726 Connecting during times of disconnection: student-teacher partnerships in co-designing online education 2021-11-03T09:10:07-07:00 Caelan Rafferty caelan.t.rafferty@outlook.com Kelly Matthews k.matthews1@uq.edu.au 2021-10-27T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/705 A conversational framework for learning design (in adverse times) 2021-11-03T09:10:17-07:00 Johanna Tomczak psjto@leeds.ac.uk Eric Bel e.bel@tees.ac.uk 2021-10-26T13:52:40-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/767 Home alone? Creating accessible, meaningful online learning spaces to teach academic writing to doctoral students 2021-11-03T09:10:21-07:00 Vera Leberecht LEBERECHT@ziggo.nl 2021-10-26T10:56:17-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/754 A personal reflection on doctoral student progression during the COVID-19 pandemic 2021-11-03T09:10:24-07:00 Nomathemba Ndlovu nomandlovu23@gmail.com 2021-10-26T10:36:46-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/654 The challenge of maintaining doctoral student well-being during Covid-19 confinement 2021-11-03T09:11:10-07:00 Abdelhafid Jabri jabriprof2006@gmail.com 2021-10-26T09:53:45-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/774 Contact, connection, and communication: online community building on a professional doctorate 2021-11-03T09:11:13-07:00 Karen Smith k.smith27@herts.ac.uk 2021-10-26T09:25:43-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/758 Adapting community-focused writing support for researchers to synchronous online delivery 2021-11-03T09:11:18-07:00 Nicola Grayson nicola.grayson@manchester.ac.uk Anna Theis anna.theis@manchester.ac.uk 2021-10-25T07:43:22-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/766 Teaching and learning under emergency remote, online conditions: ‘Let’s Connect’ with our students 2021-11-03T09:11:22-07:00 Shalini Dukhan shalini.dukhan2@wits.ac.za 2021-10-25T07:11:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/805 Lectures in lockdown: trying to rescue the lecture as event 2021-11-03T09:11:25-07:00 Paul O'Kane p.o-kane@csm.arts.ac.uk 2021-10-25T07:00:38-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/734 Challenges and serendipities: group working under conditions of social distancing and dual modes of delivery 2021-11-03T09:11:29-07:00 Sam Hopkins s.hopkins@surrey.ac.uk Shelini Surendran s.surendran@surrey.ac.uk 2021-10-25T06:25:15-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/782 Get me outta here! Motivating online learners with digital escape rooms 2021-11-03T09:11:33-07:00 Lucy Gill-Simmen lucy.gill-simmen@rhul.ac.uk 2021-10-25T06:14:29-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/696 Watch party lectures: synchronous delivery of asynchronous material 2021-11-03T09:11:37-07:00 Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel carolina.kuepper-tetzel@glasgow.ac.uk Emily Nordmann emily.nordmann@glasgow.ac.uk 2021-10-25T06:03:48-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/661 When online student numbers double during a pandemic 2021-11-03T09:11:40-07:00 Nicholas WD Bowskill n.icholasbowskill@gmail.com David Hall D.Hall@derby.ac.uk Lucy Hutchinson L.Hutchinson@derby.ac.uk Melody Harrogate M.Harrogate@derby.ac.uk 2021-10-25T04:45:39-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/773 Facilitating informal spaces and discussions in the online environment (not always) about assessments 2021-11-03T09:11:44-07:00 Matthew Mesley mm.mesley@gmail.com 2021-10-25T03:09:38-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/706 How my failure to read a play helped my students develop their learning 2021-11-03T10:20:53-07:00 Lucinda Becker l.m.becker@reading.ac.uk 2021-10-25T02:53:28-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/804 Small worlds and short stories: play, pleasure and imagination deployed as a salve to isolated learning 2021-11-03T09:13:56-07:00 Paul O'Kane p.o-kane@csm.arts.ac.uk 2021-10-25T02:46:28-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/784 ‘Hacking’ the pandemic: turning online work challenges into learning with IMPACT 2021-11-03T09:14:00-07:00 Caroline Keenan c.keenan@exeter.ac.uk Constantine Manolchev C.Manolchev@exeter.ac.uk 2021-10-25T02:37:45-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/666 Teaching the literature of the sixteenth-century plague during the Covid-19 pandemic 2021-11-03T09:14:02-07:00 Aoileann Ni Eigeartaigh aoileann.nieigeartaigh@dkit.ie 2021-10-25T02:26:52-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/735 Lessons from a virtual field trip: Adapting explorative and immersive learning pedagogy 2021-11-03T09:14:05-07:00 Joseph Davies joseph.davies@dukekunshan.edu.cn Laura Davies laura.davies@dukekunshan.edu.cn 2021-10-14T13:31:11-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/777 Google Earth as a resource for remote teaching: an application to crime scene investigation 2021-11-03T09:14:09-07:00 Katie Davidson kj-davidson@hotmail.com 2021-10-14T13:25:55-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/732 Maintaining a clinical learning environment for medical students during a pandemic 2021-11-03T09:14:12-07:00 Kirsty Morrison medkmora@leeds.ac.uk Sally West sally.west1@nhs.net Kathryn Hogg Kathryn.hogg4@nhs.net 2021-10-14T13:16:27-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/736 Moving hands-on anatomy teaching online: a reflection on creative solutions 2021-11-03T09:14:16-07:00 Claire Timmins claire.timmins@strath.ac.uk 2021-10-14T13:10:11-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/796 Simulating cadaveric dissection with virtual resources during Covid-19 in an undergraduate Anatomy Science programme 2021-11-03T09:15:59-07:00 Ourania Varsou ourania.varsou@glasgow.ac.uk Michelle Welsh michelle.welsh@glasgow.ac.uk 2021-10-14T10:38:42-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/674 The apron challenge: embodied and creative learning online and at a distance 2021-11-03T09:16:04-07:00 John Desire j.desire@londonmet.ac.uk Tom Burns t.burns@londonmet.ac.uk Sandra Sinfield s.sinfield@londonmet.ac.uk Janet Gordon j.gordon@londonmet.ac.uk 2021-10-14T10:29:31-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/725 Collaborating on a creative solution to teach creativity to Business students 2021-11-03T09:16:08-07:00 Dewa Wardak dewa.wardak@sydney.edu.au Abdul Razeed abdul.razeed@sydney.edu.au Jane Thogersen jane.thogersen@sydney.edu.au Eve Guerry eve.guerry@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-14T10:22:37-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/668 Blended learning opportunities: skills for working with primary sources 2021-11-03T09:16:12-07:00 Zoe Enstone z.enstone@yorksj.ac.uk 2021-10-14T10:13:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/742 Object handling workshops in an online teaching environment 2021-11-03T09:16:15-07:00 Jessica Clarke Jessica.clarke.15@ucl.ac.uk 2021-10-14T10:06:24-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/761 Performing community: an online tea break as a radical act 2021-11-03T09:16:18-07:00 Carina Buckley carina.buckley@solent.ac.uk 2021-10-14T07:57:01-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/658 Providing Business school students with online social networking opportunities during remote learning 2021-11-03T09:16:21-07:00 Xianghan O'Dea c.odea@yorksj.ac.uk 2021-10-14T07:50:37-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/798 Adopting a pedagogy of kindness 2021-11-03T09:22:17-07:00 Alison Gilmour a.j.gilmour@greenwich.ac.uk 2021-10-14T07:44:02-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/768 Keeping well, teaching well: supporting staff wellbeing 2021-11-03T09:22:21-07:00 Katy Savage kathleen.savage@strath.ac.uk Sean Morrissey sean.morrissey@strath.ac.uk 2021-10-14T07:36:36-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/755 We're all in the same boat: humanising teaching and learning experiences as a way to achieve engaging and interactive online provision 2021-11-03T09:22:25-07:00 Julia Kotula jkotula@aub.ac.uk Kizzy Beaumont kbeaumont@aub.ac.uk 2021-10-14T07:27:57-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/683 Pandemic promenadology: walking for wellbeing in academic life 2021-11-03T09:22:29-07:00 Jana Fedtke jfedtke@aus.edu 2021-10-14T06:52:33-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/664 Honouring loved ones who have passed: bringing grief into the pedagogical frame during the pandemic 2021-11-03T09:22:32-07:00 Farrukh Akhtar f.akhtar@sgul.kingston.ac.uk 2021-10-14T06:44:40-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/765 Facilitating connections and supporting a learning community: together 2021-11-03T09:22:35-07:00 Samantha Aston sam.aston@manchester.ac.uk Michael Stevenson michael.stevenson@manchester.ac.uk Padma Inala padma.inala@manchester.ac.uk 2021-10-14T06:27:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/737 Building relationships in the ‘cyber abyss’: learning from engagement failures 2021-11-03T09:22:39-07:00 Clare Brown clare.brown.2@glasgow.ac.uk 2021-10-14T06:13:03-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/792 Pandemic perceptions: redefining the presence and value of one-to-one interactions and learning development in troublesome times 2021-11-03T09:22:43-07:00 Heather Barker h.barker@surrey.ac.uk Robert Walsha r.walsha@surrey.ac.uk 2021-10-14T06:06:53-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/778 An alternative to clapping for the NHS: online support for NHS placement students 2021-11-03T09:22:48-07:00 Anna Judd-Yelland anna.yelland@gmail.com 2021-10-14T06:00:06-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/701 Learning by engaging: connecting with our students to keep them active and attentive in online classes 2021-11-03T09:22:52-07:00 Lynn Gribble l.gribble@unsw.edu.au Janis Wardrop j.wardrop@unsw.edu.au 2021-10-14T01:42:35-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/691 Playful reflective thinking in a HyFlex classroom: using nostalgic games to engage students 2021-11-03T09:24:01-07:00 Nayiri Keshishi n.keshishi@surrey.ac.uk 2021-10-14T01:27:14-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/730 'Can you hear me? Are you there?': student engagement in an online environment 2021-11-03T09:24:04-07:00 Karen Symons karen.symons@dmu.ac.uk 2021-10-14T01:09:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/785 Face-to-face teaching changed too! Perspectives on the transition from large to small group teaching and learning from graduate teaching assistants 2021-11-03T09:24:06-07:00 Daniel Tinnion tinniond@edgehill.ac.uk Thomas Simpson simpsont@edgehill.ac.uk Mitchell Finlay finlaym@edgehill.ac.uk 2021-10-14T00:55:35-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/757 Adapt and thrive: student engagement on a Business and Economics Foundation Year programme during Covid-19 2021-11-03T09:24:09-07:00 Gerald Dampier g.dampier@surrey.ac.uk 2021-10-14T00:43:44-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/783 Putting community first: supporting (a)synchronous interaction and belonging in online learning 2021-11-03T09:24:13-07:00 Ian Garner ian.garner@queensu.ca Lindsay Heggie heggiel@queensu.ca 2021-10-14T00:34:32-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/759 Moving Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (LTHE) online: can we have the cake and eat it too? 2021-11-03T09:24:17-07:00 Giorgia Pigato g.pigato@exeter.ac.uk 2021-10-14T00:14:08-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/806 The challenges of copyright education and the Covid-19 pandemic as a catalyst for change 2021-11-03T09:24:19-07:00 Alison Gilmour a.j.gilmour@greenwich.ac.uk Irene Barranco Garcia I.Barranco@greenwich.ac.uk 2021-10-14T00:06:04-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/677 Just-in-time pandemic CPD using short screencast videos 2021-11-03T09:24:22-07:00 Virna Rossi v.rossi@rave.ac.uk 2021-10-14T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/667 There is nothing like a pandemic – to force rapid change and upskilling in higher education 2021-11-03T09:24:25-07:00 Sabina Cerimagic sabina.cerimagic@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-13T23:52:02-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/775 Locating opportunities for building digital confidence in staff 2021-11-03T09:24:27-07:00 Rachel Bancroft rachel.bancroft@ntu.ac.uk Rosemary Pearce rosemary.pearce@ntu.ac.uk Rachel Challen rachel.challen@ntu.ac.uk David Jeckells david.jeckells@ntu.ac.uk Joseph Kenney joseph.kenney@ntu.ac.uk 2021-10-13T23:41:16-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/713 Storyboarding and suggestopedia for curriculum re-design 2021-11-03T09:26:09-07:00 Isabel Lucas isabel.lucas@cumbria.ac.uk Amanda Chapman amanda.chapman@cumbria.ac.uk 2021-10-13T23:32:46-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/729 Pivoting academic skills support online: a critical reflection on practice 2021-11-03T09:26:13-07:00 Julie Nolan Julie.Nolan@edgehill.ac.uk Helen Jamieson Helen.Jamieson@edgehill.ac.uk 2021-10-13T23:28:30-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/672 Keep calm and carry on with small tweaks: teamwork in the pandemic 2021-11-03T09:26:16-07:00 Weijia Li weijia.li@rochester.edu 2021-10-13T23:27:29-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/770 Reconceptualising Learning and Teaching staff development at Strathclyde: supplementing formal provision with informal spaces 2021-11-03T09:26:20-07:00 Sean Morrissey sean.morrissey@strath.ac.uk Katy Savage kathleen.savage@strath.ac.uk 2021-10-13T23:22:14-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/693 Powerful conversation for learning 2021-11-03T09:26:24-07:00 Karen Clark k.clark@herts.ac.uk Joy Jarvis j.jarvis@herts.ac.uk Amanda Yip p.y.a.yip@herts.ac.uk 2021-10-13T23:10:15-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/697 Does Zoom allow for efficient and meaningful group work? Translating staff development for online delivery during Covid-19 2021-11-03T09:28:27-07:00 Hazel Ruth Corradi bsphre@bath.ac.uk 2021-10-13T13:43:11-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/703 Transition online: challenges and achievements 2021-11-03T09:28:30-07:00 Jonathan Andrews j.m.andrews@bham.ac.uk 2021-10-13T13:20:39-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/744 Teaching writing online: technology means more writing, more interactivity 2021-11-03T09:28:32-07:00 Tzipora Rakedzon hutzipi@technion.ac.il 2021-10-13T12:12:58-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/740 The use of virtual drop-in sessions during Covid-19 as a means to increase engagement with learning development 2021-11-03T09:28:35-07:00 Dr Ed Bickle ebickle@bournemouth.ac.uk Dr Stephanie Allen stephaniea@bournemouth.ac.uk Dr Marian Mayer mmayer@bournemouth.ac.uk 2021-10-13T12:04:16-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/720 Remote learning might be new, but how we can learn best is not 2021-11-03T09:28:40-07:00 Carrie Hanson carrie.hanson@mcgill.ca Alexander Liepins alexander.liepins@mcgill.ca 2021-10-13T11:55:57-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/772 Working in partnership to deliver a skills course to social work apprentices: avoiding technological determinism 2021-11-03T09:28:43-07:00 Chad McDonald c.mcdonald@mmu.ac.uk Rebecca Parry r.parry@chester.ac.uk 2021-10-13T11:52:13-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/679 Teaching academic software via YouTube videos in the Covid-19 pandemic: potential applications for learning development 2021-11-03T09:28:46-07:00 Lee Fallin Lee.fallin@hull.ac.uk 2021-10-13T11:46:05-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/795 A reflection on students’ Self-Regulated Learning and the role of the academic skills advisor during Covid-19 2021-11-03T09:28:50-07:00 Alexandra Read A.read@uos.ac.uk 2021-10-13T11:37:01-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/678 Establishing a digital tutoring hub to support students in a virtual space 2021-11-03T09:28:53-07:00 Karen Kenny karen.kenny@exeter.ac.uk 2021-10-13T11:32:42-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/741 MSc student voices about learning together in an online academic conversation club: a collaborative student project 2021-11-03T09:28:56-07:00 Anita Fromm a.fromm@herts.ac.uk Bolatito Adigun-Lawal bl20aaf@herts.ac.uk Stella Akinmoju sa20abh@herts.ac.uk Nnenna Onyenucheya no20aaj@herts.ac.uk Frederick Otchere fo20aap@herts.ac.uk Victoria Udeh vu20aae@herts.ac.uk 2021-10-13T06:22:46-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/722 Designing workshops to be sociable rather than remote 2021-11-03T09:28:59-07:00 Carmen Vallis carmen.vallis@sydney.edu.au 2021-10-13T06:11:11-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/781 Pivoting PGT dissertation provision for online learning: our response, reflections, and recommendations 2021-11-03T09:29:03-07:00 Elina Koristashevskaya elina.koristashevskaya@glasgow.ac.uk Stuart Purcell stuart.purcell@glasgow.ac.uk 2021-10-13T06:06:02-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/771 When the flipped classroom disappoints: engaging students with asynchronous learning 2021-11-03T10:48:57-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-13T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/797 Keep Learning in a pandemic: podcasts for learning development conversations and informal learning 2021-11-03T09:29:09-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk Matthew Mesley matthew.mesley@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-10-06T06:35:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/647 Centralisation: placing Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) within the wider work of learning developers 2021-09-30T15:24:05-07:00 Maxinne Connolly-Panagopoulos Maxinne.Connolly-Panagopoulos@glasgow.ac.uk <p>This article investigated whether a centralised PASS system, run in partnership between academic leads (ALs) and Learning Developers (LDs), might be supported by staff and students currently involved in PASS (N=10) within a Higher Education Institution (HEI). The study interviewed staff from the humanities, physical science, medical science and the arts. Findings revealed that all participants were in favour of some form of centralisation. Centralised training of PASS mentors, advertising and quality control received the strongest support. Based on these findings, the article argues that if LDs work closely with ALs, centralisation is a viable solution to common challenges to PASS such as low attendance, misconceptions about PASS, administrative costs and scheme maintenance.</p> 2021-09-29T07:15:37-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/650 Library Pedagogies: Personal reflections from library practitioners 2021-09-30T15:24:32-07:00 Kimberly Hoffman khoffman@library.rochester.edu <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a book where European and American academic librarians discuss their journeys of becoming teachers. Many did not pursue librarianship to engage in teaching but found themselves in roles that required instruction, despite a lack of preparation for classroom teaching within their MLIS programs. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">They reflect back on past influences including personal background, key teachers and other figures that served as models, institutions and ways of learning that made an impact, and scholarship in the field of education and librarianship, all of which has formed deep rooted values which ground the basis of pedagogical pathways.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The reflections are personal and individual. While themes and practices will begin to connect across the chapters, readers are encouraged to read each of the chapters but in no particular order. Find the titles or author profiles that resonate first and browse the book from there.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;</span></p> 2021-09-28T08:35:44-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/646 Reflections on how librarians teach information literacy 2021-09-30T15:24:58-07:00 Michelle Breen michelle.breen@gmail.com <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong>This book will help librarians to reflect on and improve their teaching to meet the contemporary needs of their learners and develop the information and digital skills of students. Librarians who teach don’t need reminding of the many definitions that exist for information literacy from ALA, ANCIL and CILIP as examples. Equally important in current library instruction is the JISC definition of digital literacy: “<em>equipping students to live, learn and work in a digital society</em>” (JISC, 2019).</p> <p>As information literacy instruction does, the contributions in this book transcend subject discipline. Rather than prescribing one single ‘best’ way of teaching, the book presents a range of pedagogical approaches, giving librarians a menu of options to experiment with to suit them, their topic, their institution and its learners. This book has practical advice on how to help students learn new skills from library instructional sessions.</p> 2021-09-28T08:32:13-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/659 HE staff’s attitudes and expectations about their role in induction activities 2021-09-30T15:25:24-07:00 Camila Devis-Rozental cdevisrozental@bournemouth.ac.uk Susanne Clarke sclarke@bournemouth.ac.uk <p>The views of higher education staff regarding their role on the induction period has not been fully explored. Yet this transition to university is a complex for students. In the UK, many students who are going to university leave home, some for the first time, having to learn to deal with many new and sometimes difficult situations they may not have come across before. During the induction period students come across many staff within the university and these interactions are vital to support students in developing a sense of belonging within the university community. This small-scale project sought to evaluate the current provision for the induction process in a UK university to identify areas for improvement, by seeking the views regarding the induction activities from staff within a UK university. Findings from a staff survey with 58 participants suggest opportunities to improve practice. The main areas identified were a need for better communication between teams and effective training and support for staff to understand the issues students may face and type of support they will need. Additionally, the need to develop a more unifying understanding of every member of the university as an active participant within the induction process was highlighted.</p> 2021-09-28T08:03:35-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/641 Task-specific short PowerPoints for effective off-campus learning in Diagnostic Radiography 2021-09-30T15:25:50-07:00 James Elliott james.elliott@canterbury.ac.uk <p>This case study details the implementation of task-specific PowerPoint™ presentations for an undergraduate diagnostic radiography module in response to the first COVID-19 lockdown in the United Kingdom. A series of short, focussed learning materials was created over a two-month period to alleviate student anxieties and improve assessment literacy concerning evidence-based practice and research skills. Alternative file sizes were offered with optional embedded narration for time- or internet-poor students. Statistical tracking on the Blackboard virtual learning environment showed high levels of student interaction, with positive qualitative feedback and satisfactory impact upon assessment outcomes. A correlation between a lack of content usage and poor academic results could be inferred, with three students failing one or both assessments through reduced or absent use. Despite the benefits of weekly additional content, it was not possible to ascertain whether students viewed/listened to downloaded files. Furthermore, instructional presentations may encourage surface learning rather than a deeper comprehension. Recommendations include using video streaming platforms to provide meta-data on student interaction alongside periodic formative assessments for confirmation of comprehension. Lastly, this research recognises remote learning’s potential to alienate students who prefer in-person teaching in a more sociable environment.</p> 2021-09-28T07:46:56-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/631 Harnessing the potential of extracurricular opportunities to enhance graduate employability in higher education 2021-09-30T15:26:15-07:00 Maria Moxey maria.moxey@winchester.ac.uk Edward Simpkin simpkined@gmail.com <p>This paper addresses the emerging theme in the literature that graduates often do not demonstrate the relevant skills to employers in job applications, interviews and in the workplace, and that HEIs should harness the potential of extra-curricular opportunities to enhance employability (Tchibozo, 2007; Griffiths et al., 2017). This study reports on a survey which was distributed to students in voluntary committee roles at one university to garner information around students’ ability to identify the skills gained in their roles that are transferable as employability skills. The students’ level of confidence and readiness to articulate these skills during the job application process was then explored. Results suggest that, while students feel as though they are confident and ready to draw on skills developed in extra-curricular voluntary roles, questions could be raised as to whether their ability to identify and articulate them accurately reflects their level of confidence. Therefore, a workshop and resource have been created as part of the project to help students be able to recognise and articulate the employability skills gained.</p> 2021-09-28T07:33:37-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/627 Understanding college students' e-loyalty to online practicum courses in hospitality programmes during COVID-19 2021-09-30T15:26:41-07:00 Yoanita Alexandra yoanita.alexandra@gmail.com Septi Fahmi Choirisa septi.choirisa@umn.ac.id <p>This study aims to examine the students’ loyalty to an online practicum course for hospitality education during Covid-19 pandemic in Indonesia. Premised on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), we adopted a revised model consisting of Information System Success Model and Expectancy Confirmation Theory (ECT) to ascertain the students’ perceptions of the usefulness of the programme and their levels of satisfaction with, and e-loyalty to, the programme. This study utilized an online survey to obtain data from 309 participants. The partial least squares structural equation modelling method was employed in this study. The findings show that students’ perceptions of the usefulness of online learning were significantly influenced by information quality, system quality &amp; system interaction which relate to satisfaction. Preliminary research provides the insight for stakeholders such as vocational institutions, teachers and practitioners of education to gain a better understanding the factors that contribute to hospitality students continued intentional use of online course.</p> <p><strong>Keywords</strong>: e-learning, practicum courses, hospitality students, pandemic Covid-19, student satisfaction, e-loyalty</p> 2021-09-28T07:20:33-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/810 ‘We had a good laugh together’: using Teams for collaborative learning 2021-09-30T15:27:33-07:00 Katy Jones jonesks1@cardiff.ac.uk <p>This case study describes the journey of an undergraduate module in its transition from an in-person lectures-plus-seminar configuration to an interactive, online format using Teams. I show how I created a sense of community and the opportunity for online group interaction by establishing small study groups that carried out weekly online group tasks in their own Team ‘channel’. Weekly roles were assigned to group members to spread the workload and ensure equal participation. Student feedback was overwhelmingly positive, and students particularly appreciated the opportunity to interact with their peers, during a potentially lonely time, for summative marks. Limitations to the model are discussed and potential solutions are offered.</p> 2021-09-28T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/831 Editorial 2021-09-30T15:27:07-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-09-28T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/615 Learners’ perceptions of the effectiveness of using self-reflection to understand English literary texts: towards an autonomous learning approach in Libya 2021-09-30T15:27:59-07:00 Hana El-Badri mohamed.hana87@yahoo.com Fatma Abu-baker afamah_2004@yahoo.com <p>Teaching learners to reflect on their work has been widely researched within language-learning contexts in higher education. Research has revealed that self-reflection leads to both development in learners’ reading comprehension and lecturers being enabled to write more meaningful corrective feedback on learners’ assignments. Using a collaborative teaching approach at Benghazi university, this research evaluated the effectiveness of using a self-reflection worksheet for understanding short stories based on the perspectives of 19 tertiary Libyan learners and the course lecturers’ feedback.</p> <p>The research process involved the learners first reading a short story and answering text comprehension questions and a reflection question in which they commented on their understanding. They were then introduced to the self-reflection worksheet and advised how to use it in their second reading of the same story. This self-reflection worksheet included a section where students added reflections on their understanding following the second reading, supported by the worksheet. Content analysis was used for the qualitative data that investigated the learners’ reflection after their first and second reading. It was also used for staff feedback on the learners’ reflections.</p> <p>The findings show the usefulness of using the self-reflection worksheet in supporting the learners’ meaning understanding. It also helped them make positive changes during their second reading of the story. Evidence suggests that using worksheets for reading literary texts is effective in improving levels of reading comprehension. Implications and suggestions for effective teaching practice and future research are provided in this paper.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 2021-09-21T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/575 Using Padlet in instructional design to promote cognitive engagement: a case study of undergraduate marketing students 2021-03-30T13:15:48-07:00 Lucy Gill-Simmen lucy.gill-simmen@rhul.ac.uk <p>This case study illustrates the incorporation of Padlet to support a learning task designed to promote student engagement. Padlet was introduced as a digital technology platform in an undergraduate marketing class for an assessment where the stakes are considered low, that is, a formative assessment. The previous cohort had declared it difficult to engage with the original assessment, which took the form of a 1000-word written piece. To facilitate interest and motivation in the task, Padlet was introduced with the assumption that students would engage more with a task if a technology-based instructional design was implemented. This case study examines the use of Padlet to provide a platform for literacy beyond the written text, aimed to increase effort and cognitive engagement. Self-reported results indicate that students find a task supported by the use of Padlet deeply cognitively engaging. Padlet, as illustrated in this case study, could be used in either an in-person or online learning environment.</p> 2021-03-30T00:49:45-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/605 Reviewing the effect of student mentoring on the academic performance of undergraduate students identified as ‘at risk’ 2021-03-30T13:16:13-07:00 Chris Maharaj chrismaharaj@yahoo.com Erik Blair erikblairuk@gmail.com Margo Burns margo.burns@sta.uwi.edu <p>This paper outlines an early intervention programme based upon the belief that being proactive rather than reactive increases a student’s academic and social success. Twenty-one students from a cohort of 40 who were identified as being ‘at risk’ participated in a three-session mentoring programme. Grade-point averages (GPAs) were recorded pre- and post- intervention, for both the intervention group and those who did not participate in the programme. Results are interpreted through the lens of Attribution Theory – in which outcomes are related to how perceived challenges are addressed. The results show that, on average, the GPAs for those who received mentoring improved by 35% between semester 1 and semester 2, whereas the non-intervention group only increased their GPAs by an average of 15%.</p> 2021-03-30T00:39:08-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/649 Editorial 2021-03-30T13:16:40-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2021-03-30T00:37:26-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/636 Maximizing the impacts of academic research 2021-03-30T13:17:08-07:00 Samantha Jane Ahern s.ahern@ucl.ac.uk <p>A Book review of Dunleavy, P. and Tinkler, J. (2021) <em>Maximizing the impacts of academic research</em>. London: Red Globe Press</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 2021-03-24T04:00:47-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/635 Skills for business and management 2021-03-30T13:17:34-07:00 Anne Elizabeth Davey adavey@bournemouth.ac.uk <p>A book review of Sedgley, M. (2020) <em>Skills for business and management.</em> London: Red Globe Press</p> 2021-03-24T03:54:50-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/639 Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework 2021-03-30T13:18:00-07:00 Teresa De Fazio Teresa.defazio@vu.edu.au <p>A book review of A. French, and K. Carruthers Thomas (eds) (2020) Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework: diversity deficits in higher education evaluations. &nbsp;Bingley: Emerald Publishing.</p> 2021-03-24T03:50:54-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/633 Skills for business and management 2021-03-30T13:18:26-07:00 Hazel Messenger h.messenger@londonmet.ac.uk <p>A book review of Sedgley, M. (2020) <em>Skills for business and management</em>. London: Red Globe Press</p> 2021-03-24T03:50:13-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/604 Should Learning Developers provide instruction in the use of metadiscourse? 2021-03-30T13:18:52-07:00 Samantha King samantha.king@northampton.ac.uk <p>Metadiscourse is the language writers use to guide their readers through their texts and organise their arguments. This can take the form of phrases, for example, ‘this essay will discuss’, or ‘in conclusion’, or individual words such as ‘firstly’ or ‘therefore’. This study aims to determine how undergraduate students develop their use of metadiscourse over their first two years of study at a UK university and to investigate whether use of metadiscourse is related to the grade that a text receives from subject tutors. To achieve this, a corpus of summative written assignments was collected from 67 undergraduates studying a health discipline. This is the writing that we as Learning Developers are most closely involved with: assignments written as part of a course of study. The assignments were analysed using software developed for the field of corpus linguistics to identify how students used metadiscourse. The results of this study suggest that including explicit instruction in Learning Development sessions in the use of some aspects of metadiscourse could be of value. This supports an ‘academic literacies’ (Lea and Street, 1998) approach in that it recognises the need to make clear the implied assumptions that surround academic writing and the inherent variation between disciplines.</p> 2021-03-23T10:51:53-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/593 Impact of writing workshops on doctoral student wellness 2021-03-30T13:19:21-07:00 Charles Buckley charlesb@liverpool.ac.uk Eli Saetnan saetnan@liverpool.ac.uk Amelia Gerber ameliakgerber@hotmail.com Joanna Cheetham joannac@liverpool.ac.uk Thomas Price tarp201@liverpool.ac.uk Jenna Kenyani bs0u40f7@liverpool.acuk Alan Greaves greaves@liverpool.ac.uk <p>Few interventions addressing student wellbeing have been designed or evaluated specifically with doctoral students in mind despite the doctoral experience being distinct from that of other students. We therefore explore the benefits of interventions designed specifically to address a key source of stress or anxiety for doctoral students, namely thesis writing.</p> <p>This research uses a mixed-methods approach to explore the ways in which doctoral thesis writing support sessions, in the form of writing workshops or writing retreats, can reduce the stress and anxiety associated with thesis writing specifically or academic writing more generally. Firstly, we quantified the reduction in writing related stress and anxiety associated with workshop participation using a survey completed before and after workshop attendance. Subsequently, we gathered student experiences of workshop participation through focus group interviews.</p> <p>Survey responses showed a clear reduction in participants’ levels of stress and anxiety related to thesis writing and focus group respondents described many clear benefits of participating in writing support sessions. We conclude that participation in thesis writing workshops and writing retreats is a valuable strategy for reducing stress and anxiety associated with thesis writing. The sense of empowerment and confidence that comes from discussing thesis writing in a supportive environment with others in the same situation, and the opportunity to experiment with new tools and strategies, is very valuable for improving the wellbeing of doctoral students.</p> 2021-03-03T06:26:31-08:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/626 On peer reviewing: how to nourish an author’s mind and win a JLDHE editor’s heart 2021-02-09T07:43:14-08:00 Eleanor Loughlin eleanor.loughlin@durham.ac.uk Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk Gita Sedghi g.sedghi@liverpool.ac.uk Christina Howell-Richardson christina.richardson@btopenworld.com <p>Editors and publishers of scholarly journals rarely agree on what makes for a good publication; they do, however, agree on the need for a robust peer review process as a crucial means to judge the merits of potential publications. While fraught with issues and inefficiencies, a critical and supportive peer review is not only what editors rely on when assessing scholarship presented for publication but also what authors hope for in order to improve their work. Understanding how peer review may best serve all parties involved: authors, editors, and reviewers, is thus at the heart of this article. The analysis offered here is based on a session the Journal for Learning Development in Higher Education editors gave at the 2020 LD@3 seminar series, entitled ‘The Art of Reviewing’. It explores the different aspects of the peer review process while formulating recommendations regarding best practices and outlining JLDHE initiatives for supporting reviewers’ vital work.</p> 2020-12-16T02:44:25-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/622 Creative solutions to common groupwork problems 2020-12-16T11:34:50-08:00 Helena Beeson helena.beeson@northampton.ac.uk Richard Byles richard.byles@northampton.ac.uk <p>This case study considers a new workshop activity designed to provide the opportunity for students in the Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) to practice the skills associated with groupwork. A need was established through discussions between Faculty tutors and the authors, a Learning Development tutor and a Learning Technologist, for learners to model the process utilising technology. A scenario workshop was devised where groups negotiated, scripted and filmed responses to given team problems. The prospect of potentially advising future students through video without being assessed appeared to galvanise groups and received positive feedback. Surveys were taken at the beginning of the process to establish participants’ previous experiences of groupwork, and this data informed five scenarios for future cohorts to storyboard their strategies. Feedback on the workshop activity has demonstrated that using video technologies together with scenario-based role-play can be an effective strategy in helping students to become effective group members. &nbsp;</p> 2020-12-16T01:00:38-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/623 Conversations in writing 2020-12-16T11:35:14-08:00 Claire Saunders c.e.saunders@open.ac.uk <p>A book review of M. Healey, K.E. Matthews and A. Cook-Sather (2020) <em>Writing about learning and teaching in higher education: creating and contributing to scholarly conversations</em>. North Carolina: Center for Engaged Learning</p> 2020-12-16T00:42:15-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/610 Power and paragraphs: academic writing and emotion 2020-12-16T11:35:40-08:00 Emily Charlotte Forster emily.forster@dmu.ac.uk <p>Emotions play an important role in academic writing (Cameron, Nairn and Higgins, 2009), and, as learning developers, we often support students with the emotional aspects of their work. The process of writing is strongly linked to identity. Research into academic literacies has highlighted the fact that this often involves complex negotiations, especially for students from widening participation backgrounds (Lea and Street, 1998). Students’ past experiences of learning strongly shape their identity as learners. For example, the early challenges with literacy faced by people with dyslexia often continue to affect their emotions in adulthood (Pollak, 2005; Alexander-Passe, 2015). The concept of learning identities (Bloomer and Hodkinson, 2000; Christie et al., 2007) helps us to understand students’ emotional responses in the wider context of their lives. This paper uses two case histories of students with dyslexia, who were also the first in their family to go to university, to explore the role of academic writing in shaping a student’s learning identity. It argues that learning developers are in a good position to help students develop a positive sense of themselves as academic writers.</p> 2020-12-16T00:29:12-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/628 Editorial 2020-12-16T11:36:07-08:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2020-12-16T00:17:57-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/606 Can you teach research in 10 minutes? Embedding information literacy micro-sessions in module programmes 2020-12-16T11:36:32-08:00 Rachael Hunter ac7257@coventry.ac.uk <p>This case study discusses the inception and continued delivery of 10-minute micro research skills sessions within two entrepreneurship modules at Coventry University London. The case study starts with an explanation of how and why the project was developed. Its rationale was underpinned by both established, current bite-sized learning research, and established psychological and neural evidence. This paper describes how these practices are used in the workplace to promote continuous professional development and disseminate company information for training purposes. Discussing both the delivery and skills content, this paper explains the methods used by the Information and Skills Development Specialist (ISDS) in each 10-minute session to engage students and embed database searching skills in to their routine study practices. It also explains how this practice has been adopted by students and how the skills have been embedded to enhance their final business pitches at the end of their modules.</p> 2020-12-15T01:29:37-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/611 How improvisation techniques can support researchers with the development of public speaking skills 2020-12-16T11:36:57-08:00 Nicola Grayson nicola.grayson@manchester.ac.uk Jessica Napthine-Hodgkinson jessica.napthine-hodgkinson@manchester.ac.uk <p>Through the presentation of a workshop entitled ‘Enhancing public speaking skills using improvisation techniques’ this case study will argue that improvisational techniques can disrupt the seriousness of researcher development training to release stress and provide a cathartic space for researchers to develop skills and support one another. The landscape of researcher support is traditionally a serious terrain, and the impacts of the pressures faced by researchers are well documented (Evans et al., 2018). Opportunities for researchers to work together and support one another are relatively rare, yet research has shown that peer-to-peer support benefits them immensely (Boud and Lee, 2007). In 2018, the University of Manchester Library reviewed its researcher development programme and adopted a new approach that emphasises the value of researchers working in a community with peers both within and outside of their subject area. The workshop exemplifies this approach, as it encourages researchers to support one another to develop public speaking skills in a way that is innovative, fun and enjoyable. Attendees work together in a space where the freedom to fail offers them a cathartic release from the pressures of perfection. As a result, researchers can reframe their worries into opportunities to connect with one another and grow and this empowers them to build confidence in their ability to engage with others in dialogue about their research.</p> 2020-12-14T07:35:20-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/582 Enhancing academic skills appointments through a new booking system 2020-12-16T11:37:45-08:00 Laurence Morris l.d.morris@leedsbeckett.ac.uk Lindsey McDermott l.mcdermott@leedsbeckett.ac.uk <p>This case study examines the introduction of a centrally managed booking system for academic skills appointments conducted by the Library Academic Support Team at Leeds Beckett University, showing how staff-student communication channels can scaffold effective student support. The new system was introduced in order to manage a large number of requests for skills appointments across all academic levels, to ensure an equitable experience for all learners, and to frame staff-student encounters more effectively at the formative stage. Further benefits included provision of more focused tuition, additional data on learner requirements, greater capacity to re-route appointment requests, and more efficient use of student and staff time, while retaining the option of human intervention in the system as required. This paper demonstrates a transferrable means of enhancing institutional processes whilst retaining the traditional strengths of one-to-one encounters in order to improve the overall student experience.</p> 2020-12-14T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/607 Emotional labour, information literacy instruction, and the COVID-19 Pandemic 2020-12-16T11:37:21-08:00 Karen Sobel karen.sobel@ucdenver.edu Lorraine Evans lorraine.evans@ucdenver.edu <p>The authors of this article, both instruction librarians, have researched the emotional labour that information literacy instruction librarians perform for several years. Several months into the COVID-19 pandemic, they discuss concepts of emotional labour among instruction librarians in that evolving context. They outline common aspects of emotional labour that manifest differently during the pandemic, compared to non-pandemic times. They identify and analyse new layers of emotional labour that many instruction librarians currently experience on top of their “normal” lives and emotional labour. They provide a brief overview of aspects of emotional labour that may be easier or lesser during the pandemic. The article concludes with a call for future research on these concepts, particularly using qualitative and mixed-methods research.</p> 2020-12-14T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/618 Editorial 2020-10-09T10:45:17-07:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2020-10-09T02:38:04-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/601 Using self-made automata to teach STEM in early childhood teacher education 2020-10-09T10:45:44-07:00 Oliver Thiel oth@dmmh.no Rolv Lundheim rlu@dmmh.no Signe Hanssen smh@dmmh.no Jørgen Moe jmo@dmmh.no Piedade Vaz Rebelo pvaz@mat.uc.pt <p>In recent decades, an increasing number of countries have integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) into their curricula for early childhood education and care (ECEC). In contrast to this trend, many ECEC professionals are still reluctant about the idea of teaching STEM to young children. A reason for this might be too little experience with and knowledge about STEM. One way to tackle this problem is to address STEM in ECEC teacher education in a way that is engaging, motivating, and practical, and shows ECEC student teachers appropriate ideas for how to teach STEM in a playful and child-centred way. This case study aims to present and analyse an innovative approach to ECEC teacher training. We let the student teachers build their own automata (toys that have mechanical moving parts) to promote a better understanding of STEM. The students were highly motivated, assessed the approach as exciting and relevant, and consequently could successfully reflect on STEM content and pedagogy.</p> 2020-10-09T02:07:18-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/591 The role of personal tutoring in supporting the transition to university: experiences and views of widening participation sport students 2020-10-09T10:46:10-07:00 Rick Hayman rick.hayman@northumbria.ac.uk Andrew Coyles andrew.coyles@northumbria.ac.uk Antony Mellor antony.mellor@northumbria.ac.uk Karl Wharton karl.wharton@northumbria.ac.uk <p>Despite the large and diverse cohorts annually recruited to Higher Education sport programmes in the UK, research exploring sport students’ experiences of transitioning into university is very limited. This study was conducted in response to several years of low retention and progression rates across first year sport degree programmes at a post-92 university in the UK. Through focus groups, the study explored the role played by the personal tutor in supporting effective transition of recently enrolled first year sport students from widening participation backgrounds. Most noticeably, the main contributory factors were found to be the nurturing of social integration and use of student-centred personal tutoring approaches to do so. The study further outlined how many widening participation sport students enter university with negative previous personal tutoring experiences and have limited understanding and misguided expectations of the role. The collective findings provide academic colleagues and university management with evidence of one model of effective support for a successful transition into university. Practical implications for widening participation students studying both sport and other degree subjects are presented, as are future research avenues and study limitations.</p> 2020-10-09T01:39:25-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/577 Are VLEs still worthwhile? 2020-10-09T10:46:36-07:00 Christine Patricia Davies christine.davies@uwtsd.ac.uk <p>This opinion piece considers the current value of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), and associated technologies such as e-portfolios, from the perspective of both lecturers and learners. Student satisfaction is discussed, and the relationship between VLE engagement and academic performance is considered. The piece concludes by highlighting the need for flexibility in the ways in which universities utilise technologies for teaching and learning.</p> 2020-09-30T09:42:15-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/576 An evaluation of a translation intervention to raise awareness of employability skills gained from higher education 2020-10-09T10:47:02-07:00 Tom Lowe tom.lowe@winchester.ac.uk <p>The challenge of ensuring that graduates of higher education are employable has become a pedagogical issue for teaching colleagues at universities worldwide. Employability, as a theme, has changed the general environment of higher education (Frankham, 2017, p.632) and is strongly emphasised on degree programmes’ planning for desired outcomes (Moore and Morton, 2017, p.591). This paper reports on an evaluation of an intervention that was conducted with eight final year (Level 6) students from multiple disciplines to investigate to what extent a translation exercise can raise student awareness of employability skills gained through their higher education experience. This study shows that through a skills translation exercise, students’ ability to highlight their graduate skills, which align to personal specification skills such as communication, organisation, and business acumen, increased. This paper reports on an intervention that was valued by the participants as having a positive impact on their understanding of their own employability and explores how translating discipline specific skills through short conversations can have relevance in the pressurised world of higher education.</p> 2020-09-29T07:42:32-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/557 Use of a marking rubric and self-assessment to provide feedforward to level 5 undergraduate Sport students: student perceptions, performance and marking efficiency 2020-10-09T10:47:28-07:00 Eddie John Bradley eddie.bradley@sunderland.ac.uk Steven Anderson steven.anderson@sunderland.ac.uk Laurence Eagle l.eagle@wlv.ac.uk <p>The aim of this study was to identify whether Level 5 Sport students find a rubric and self-assessment helpful in providing feedforward on a lab report, and if the rubric improved performance and marking efficiency. A questionnaire was administered to 58 students in order to identify perceptions. Marking time, report grades and classification were compared with the previous year. A significant improvement in the report mark of 7% (ρ=0.029) from the previous year and an increase in the number of passes in the higher classifications, along with a 25-minute decrease in the mean marking time, were observed. Perceptions of the rubric were generally positive in terms of increasing students’ understanding of the assessment. The role of the rubric in the self-assessment process was beneficial, as it enabled students to understand what they were doing well and what they needed to improve. Overall, rubrics should be considered when implementing a laboratory-based practical assessment and report.</p> 2020-09-29T02:11:51-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/571 A learning development-faculty collaborative exploration of postgraduate research student mental health in a UK university 2020-10-09T10:47:56-07:00 Russell Delderfield r.delderfield1@bradford.ac.uk Mathias Ndoma-Egba M.NdomaEgba@bradford.ac.uk Kirsten Riches-Suman k.riches@bradford.ac.uk James Boyne J.R.Boyne@hud.ac.uk <p>Mental ill-health is an escalating problem in higher education. Not only does this impact students’ ability to learn, it can lead to poor completion, with learners opting to withdraw from studies, even if attainment has been satisfactory. The aim of this study was to gain insight about perceptions of poor mental health from postgraduate research students in a diverse UK university and canvas opinion regarding how the University could improve this. A short, pragmatic survey with basic quantitative and qualitative responses was distributed. This was analysed by a team comprising the learning developer responsible for postgraduate researcher learning development, academics and a doctoral student. The study found that poor mental health was evident, with over three quarters of respondents reporting some experience of mental ill-health. We identified five areas in need of attention: University Systems, Supervisor Training, Well-being Monitoring, Building Networks, and Finance. Sources of University-based stress were finance, administrative support, and an environment where a perception that poor mental health was an expectation rather than a problem was experienced. Students preferred to access support outside the academic environment. This is the first study of its kind at a diverse, plate-glass UK university, to consider research student mental ill-health, with a staff-student team working with data, and the learning developer spear-heading changes across postgraduate research. These findings have already influenced university strategy, staff training, and induction practices. The synthesis of the five areas could be used to visualise where further work is needed to improve mental health in these learners.</p> 2020-09-29T01:48:19-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/574 A two-step model for creative teaching in higher education 2020-10-09T10:48:22-07:00 Nathalie Sheridan nathalie.sheridan@glasgow.ac.uk <p>This paper provides examples of practice demonstrating some underlying principles of translating creative and active pedagogies from school into a higher education context, using a simple two-step model and the concept of creative learning and teaching (Jeffrey, 2006). Since working in higher education, I sought to translate the principles of creative learning and teaching (Jeffrey, 2006) into my praxis. This exercise became particularly prudent when moving into academic development, trying to convey the successful principles underlying my pedagogy to colleagues on the Masters in Academic Practice. The paper will discuss a two-step model I developed: de-contextualizing and then re-contextualizing sometimes complex and intangible learning content to make it more accessible for learners. This will be exemplified by two teaching cases and evidenced with data I collected during my own Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, demonstrating how the approach improved student performance and the overall quality of their academic work. These principles could be easily translated into different disciplinary contexts, with different groups of students.</p> 2020-09-29T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/572 How will Education 4.0 influence learning in higher education? 2021-03-03T12:52:37-08:00 Alan Richard Williams a.williams@derby.ac.uk Richard Windle richard.windle@nottingham.ac.uk Heather Wharrad heather.wharrad@nottingham.ac.uk <p>Higher education at the start of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (Schwab, 2015) is undergoing unprecedented change because of the opportunities revealed through the use of digital technology. Though societies throughout time have undergone seismic change, it is the speed and magnitude of change now because of technology that is challenging higher education. The changes include access to knowledge, how that knowledge is shared and the increasing demand by students’ for their voice to be heard in their education and to be integral to the design of their learning. The opportunities revealed by the use of digital technology can lead to good and bad effects and it is essential academics and higher education investigate the design of learning objects used by students in higher education.</p> 2020-05-29T05:59:39-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/586 Editorial 2021-03-03T12:53:18-08:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2020-05-29T04:09:54-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/508 Changing the face of academic skills workshops 2021-03-03T12:53:47-08:00 Sheryl Mansfield Sheryl.Mansfield@northampton.ac.uk <p>The flipped approach offers flexibility in the way students learn and was adopted within Learning Development workshops to improve academic skills. Academic skills are predominantly taught using passive content, however the flipped approach looks to change the emphasis and provide active opportunities to understand taught knowledge. The sessions were delivered alongside self-paced, online, asynchronous content to scaffold academic skills and feed-forward guidance to inform summative assessment preparation. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of the flipped approach in delivering academic skills. A cohort of 50 first year students completed three face-to-face academic skills sessions together with the asynchronous content. Each were themed to develop different academic skills using subject specific examples. Attendance data was collected and a survey was used to evaluate the asynchronous content and measure the self-perceived academic confidence levels of students. To measure the success of the flipped approach this data was analysed together with the number of attempts at each e-tivity and the formative and summative grades. Results demonstrated those who attended two or more sessions (57.7% <sup>+</sup>/<sub>- </sub>1.43) had a significantly higher summative score (p=0.041) than those who attended 1 or less (51.7% <sup>+</sup>/<sub>- </sub>2.73). The summative grades and the number of attempts at the asynchronous content demonstrated a positive linear relationship for e-tivity 1 to 3. Overall the academic confidence improved in nearly a third of all students for each e-tivity and 17 students (54.8%) stated that they preferred the flipped approach in developing their academic skills. This emphasises that the flipped approach is an effective method to improve summative grades and deliver academic skills.</p> 2020-05-29T00:18:06-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/558 The impact of Learning Development tutorials on student attainment 2021-03-04T12:52:34-08:00 Alison Loddick alison.loddick@northampton.ac.uk Kate Coulson Kate.coulson@northampton.ac.uk <p class="Notesoncontributors" style="margin-top: 0cm;"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; line-height: 150%; font-family: 'Arial',sans-serif;">University Learning Development teams provide expert advice to learners regarding the development and enhancement of academic skills such as essay writing, dissertations, critical analysis, mathematics, and statistics. The majority of universities have set up Learning Development or similar academic support services in recent years. However, little research has been conducted to understand the effect of such help on student attainment. At the University of Northampton, this service is perceived as pivotal in supporting students through their studies. The impact on student grades and future attainment was examined using three and a half years of student assessment data (over 16,000 students and 175,000 assessments) which was connected to information gathered from the Learning Development one-to-one tutorials database. Although causality cannot be claimed, there was an average rise of one to two sub grades for learners who attended at least one Learning Development tutorial compared to those who did not use this assistance. Furthermore, historical tutorials positively affected grades of students with an additional two percent increase in their future assignments. S<span style="background: white;">tudents from the faculties of Business and Law and Education and Humanities saw the largest increase in attainment compared to students within their faculties who did not have tutorials. Furthermore, students from a black ethnic background and aged 25 years or below also gained the most in terms of attainment compared to other ethnic groups and more mature students.</span></span></p> 2020-05-29T00:09:36-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/561 Making the transition to master’s dissertation writing: evaluating the impact of a dissertation writing course on PGT students’ confidence 2021-03-03T12:55:07-08:00 Melanie Diane Crisfield melanie.crisfield@brunel.ac.uk <p> The transition from undergraduate to postgraduate taught (PGT) studies has received increasing focus over the past decade as universities and educators have recognised that master’s students do not necessarily begin their studies equipped with the academic skills necessary to succeed (O’Donnell et al., 2009; Bunney, 2017; McPherson et al., 2017). Research on postgraduate research (PGR) students demonstrates that thesis writing courses improve students’ confidence in their abilities (Larcombe et al., 2007; Fergie et al., 2011), but to date, the transition from writing for module assessments to master’s dissertation writing remains largely unstudied. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of a short master’s dissertation writing course − delivered at a British university in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 academic years − on improving students’ confidence in their writing abilities, as reported in pre-course and post-course writing self-evaluations. In both years that the course was offered, there was a significant increase in reported confidence between the first session and the final session, and thematic analysis of open-ended questions demonstrated that students enrolled on the course to improve their knowledge of and confidence in academic writing and left the course having met these goals. This paper confirms that dissertation writing support designed for PGT students can have a positive impact on students’ confidence in their writing abilities, and thus help support them in making the transition to dissertation writing.</p> 2020-05-28T23:47:52-07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/518 Review of Making it at Uni: Navigate your way through the first year of your degree by Sally Bartholomew and Jodi Withers (Bartholomew and Withers, 2018) 2021-03-03T12:55:40-08:00 Rachel Webster r.webster@bham.ac.uk N/A 2019-12-17T04:27:11-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/546 Evaluating students’ perceptions of a scenario-situated business communication course 2021-03-03T12:56:18-08:00 Siriol Lewis siriol.lewis@glasgow.ac.uk <p>Research has identified that Business students, who are immersed in theoretical concepts, may not be equipped with the skills required to operate successfully in the global workplace in the English medium (Evans, 2013). Secondly, tasks in Business English textbooks tend not to bear much resemblance to those of a work environment (Bremner, 2010; Evans, 2013). This paper discusses an optional written business communication course open to international postgraduate business school students. Although the course is worth ten credits, it can only be used for a separate award, not part of their degree programme. The course focuses on the use of appropriate register, Business English vocabulary and intertextuality, as these features have been identified as pivotal to successful written business communication (Evans, 2013). A short questionnaire was distributed to the students towards the end of course to elicit their perceptions of the usefulness of the course. Consisting of two closed questions and one open question, data was then coded using constructivist grounded theory (Mills, Birks and Hoare, 2014), from which themes emerged providing valuable and unexpected feedback. The primary finding was that the course appeared to have alerted students to the importance of the business writing genre, resulting in an overwhelming request for more instruction.</p> 2019-12-17T04:27:07-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/520 Investigating the feasibility of co-production of digital media with students 2021-03-03T12:56:43-08:00 Karin Johnstone karin.johnstone@northampton.ac.uk Samantha Thomas sam.thomas@northampton.ac.uk Nathan Dodzo nathan.dodzo@northampton.ac.uk <p>The Learning Development (LD) team has a suite of online videos which aim to provide students with support and guidance in a range of academic skills. The usage statistics show that they are more widely used than other content such as PDF documents or visual guides. An audit of these videos revealed that most were written by or featured academic and professional staff, were of poor technical quality, and were ‘talking heads’ which, rather than encourage active learning, may result in passive engagement and therefore shallow rather than deep learning (Ryan, 2013). An opportunity was identified to remake videos in collaboration with students to address these issues and to increase student participation and representation in learning development content. Two LD tutors and a media and journalism lecturer collaborated on a project to co-produce academic skills videos with students. Students were given a brief to create videos based on their own experience of study skills. They also took part in focus groups and completed a survey to find out more about their perception of educational videos and the experience of creating their own. There were two main aims in undertaking the project: the creation of original content by students that addressed some of the concerns we had about the efficacy of existing videos, and the development of a model of co-production which could be used as a framework to produce future content in collaboration with students.</p> 2019-12-17T04:27:04-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/501 Using UX research techniques to explore how Computing undergraduates understand and use library and student guidance services 2021-03-04T12:52:59-08:00 Laura Woods l.m.woods@hud.ac.uk Richard Dockery l.m.woods@hud.ac.uk Alison Sharman l.m.woods@hud.ac.uk <p>This collaborative project, between the library and student guidance services at a medium-sized UK university, used qualitative User Experience (UX) techniques to explore Computing undergraduates’ experiences of support services. The research found that most students struggled with academic skills, and felt they had lacked support in developing academic literacies. Students were often unaware of support services available from student guidance and the library. Many struggled to balance studying with work, commuting, or family life. Lack of time due to external commitments may be a barrier to accessing support services. This research project has suggested several avenues for future research, including a larger-scale study to investigate demographic categories such as mature students and overseas students, and an exploration of the needs of commuter students.</p> 2019-12-17T04:27:02-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/510 The LDHEN hive mind: Learning Development in UK higher education as a professional culture 2021-03-04T12:53:25-08:00 Katharine Stapleford k.e.stapleford@leeds.ac.uk The Learning Developer in higher education (HE) works with students to help them make sense of the language and practices of HE. It is a relatively new role and has grown in response to the Widening Participation agenda which has seen an increase in entry of 'non-traditional' students into HE. Learning developers' job descriptions, employment contracts and institutional location vary between institutions and the role is often misunderstood across academia. There has long been discussion and debate within the learning development community regarding the professionalisation of the role and what this might look like. The literature in this area is sparse and to date consists of small-scale surveys of learning development practitioners with inconclusive findings. This study aims to contribute to our understanding of learning developer professional identity by analysing six months of discourse from the Learning Development in Higher Education Network (LDHEN) Listserv. This is explored through the lens of social identity theory and findings suggest that the learning development community functions as a professional culture based on collegiality, trust, shared values and a protected collective knowledge base. This attitudinal perspective of professional identity as professional culture is proposed as a more productive approach to the debate than more traditional interpretations of professionalism based on qualifications and formal training. 2019-12-17T04:26:59-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/541 ‘Once there was a learning developer…’: the potential of parables to stimulate critique. 2021-03-04T12:53:50-08:00 Steve Rooney sgr3@le.ac.uk <p>This article builds on a workshop that took place at the Association for Learning Development in Higher Education (ALDinHE) annual conference in April 2019. It explores the role of the parable in provoking and stimulating debate and critical reflection. Beginning with a discussion of the parable as a form, the article then explores how the oft-cited parables that appear in the Gospels according to Mark, Matthew and Luke help to reveal the subversive pedagogical potential of parables. Returning to the terrain of contemporary higher education, it is argued that the parable is an apt form for encouraging education practitioners to explore more deeply and more critically some of the assumptions and practices they encounter in their working lives. All this serves as a prelude to the presentation of a selection of parables, which are accompanied by some guidance to help structure and support engagement. The article ‘concludes’, at the risk of infuriating readers, with yet another parable.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:57-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/549 Special Collections as a catalyst for flexible pedagogical approaches: three case studies 2021-03-03T13:00:13-08:00 Maria Kukhareva maria.kukhareva@beds.ac.uk Anne Lawrence anne.lawrence@beds.ac.uk Katherine Koulle katherine.koulle@ucl.ac.uk Nazlin Bhimani nazlin.bhimani@ucl.ac.uk <p>University Special Collections are increasingly being recognised as a valuable pedagogical resource in higher education teaching and learning. The value of historic artefacts as a cross-disciplinary tool to promote higher order thinking processes such as criticality, questioning and narrative construction is well-established in the museum education literature and is gaining increasing attention in teaching and learning development. In this paper, we present three case studies in which we explore the application of Special Collections in a range of learning development contexts, in order to help students engage with their discipline and discipline-specific higher order skills. Our case studies are explorative in the sense of ‘trialling’ the use of historic artefacts in the classroom, to inform our next steps and development of our method. We conclude with our reflections on the process and outcomes of our explorations, to inform our practice and that of other educators looking to apply this method.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:55-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/556 Stepping Up to Edge Hill University: the value and impact for students following the completion of a virtual pre-entry module 2021-03-03T13:00:43-08:00 Helen Jamieson helen.jamieson@edgehill.ac.uk Julie Nolan julie.nolan@edgehill.ac.uk <p>As learning developers, our main role is to support students in developing their academic skills throughout their time at university. We are particularly interested in students’ transition into university and have developed a programme-specific pre-entry module within Blackboard Open Education to support undergraduate students with their transition into their academic programme of study. As part of a pedagogical research project for the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education (PGCTHE), we have attempted to assess the value and impact of this pre-entry module. Our project employed a mixed methods analysis of a wide range of quantitative and qualitative data, including student conversion data (Quercus Student Records System); module engagement and completion data (Blackboard Open Education); student satisfaction data (Bristol Online Survey); value and impact data from key academic staff (semi-structured interviews) and students (focus group/semi-structured interview and Bristol Online Survey); and a thorough review of associated literature. We shared our preliminary findings at the Association for Learning Developers in Higher Education conference (ALDHE) in Exeter in April 2019. Our research has shown that, although student satisfaction is high with some indication of added value and a positive impact on the students’ transitional experience, these are self-reported and we thus conclude that this research would benefit from further exploration and more extensive student, stakeholder and platform evaluation.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:52-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/485 'It can't be found in books': how a flipped-classroom approach using online videos can engage postgraduate students in dissertation writing 2021-03-03T13:01:12-08:00 Jessica Clare Hancock Jessica.Hancock@city.ac.uk <p align="left">This article explores action research that introduced a flipped-classroom approach to teaching dissertation writing. The cohort involved postgraduates studying at master’s level, with a high proportion of international students. Dissertation writing had previously been taught in a lecture-based format, with limited time for activities. Moving some of the information-based content to online videos, which students were asked to watch before the teaching sessions, meant that face-to-face content could be entirely based around active learning and a social-constructivist approach. The students who experienced this flipped-classroom approach became more positive about the use of online videos during the teaching period. Many favourable comments were made about the videos, although several students appeared to prefer to use video content as a recap of face-to-face teaching, rather than appreciating a true flipped-classroom approach. Nevertheless, students agreed that the face-to-face activities helped put their learning from the videos into practice, the videos helped them to complete face-to-face activities, and that the teaching was beneficial for their dissertation writing abilities. Despite an absence of existing research for this context, a flipped-classroom approach to teaching dissertation writing is therefore recommended, as long as the students are fully briefed about the reasons for teaching in this way. This teaching method may be particularly beneficial for postgraduate students who are familiar with online learning through videos in earlier parts of their master’s level courses.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:50-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/511 Student voices in academic writing: PsychLiverpool a community for meaning making 2021-03-04T12:54:14-08:00 Alexandra Forsythe a.forsythe@wlv.ac.uk Emir Demirbag e.demirbag@liverpool.ac.uk Jasmine Warren j.warren@liverpool.ac.uk <p align="center">The practice and expectations of academic communication are changing, and blogging provides a socially liberating mechanism by which to support the development of student writing and literacy. The study reported here examines the impact of an academic–student partnership in supporting the development of student discourse. Anonymous feedback gathered from both the contributors and readers of the student blog, PsychLiverpool was analysed using automated text analysis. The analysis identified that high levels of positive emotion were associated with PsychLiverpool. Students valued its capacity to trigger thinking and insight, and the social and networking relationships the blog offered. PsychLiverpool empowered students to expand their learning networks outside of their classroom and peer network by connecting them with like-minded students and academics. By providing students with safe opportunities to develop their skills and networks, it fulfilled their needs for affiliation and achievement, power and reward. The particular advantage of PsychLiverpool was that in operating outside of traditional university processes of assessment and feedback, students were more motivated to write about and engage with academic language on their own terms.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:48-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/523 Teaching and assessment practices for academic writing: an analysis of teacher profiles 2021-03-03T13:02:40-08:00 Dyanne Escorcia dyanne.escorcia@gmail.com Mayilin Moreno mmoreno@uninorte.edu.co <div class="WordSection1"><p>The present research study aimed to determine what teachers do to promote the learning of academic writing. In particular, we studied how teachers teach and assess writing in higher education based on their self-reported teaching practices. We asked 64 teachers working in a Colombian university to fill in a questionnaire that we constructed for the purposes of the present study. The participants were teachers in the field of Health Sciences, the majority of whom were female (58%), with a mean age of 44 years. Data analysis consisted of cluster analysis based on items relative to teaching and assessing academic writing in order to determine teacher profiles. A Kruskal-Wallis H-test was then conducted to distinguish the found profiles as a function of teacher age. The results revealed three significantly different profiles: transmitting, assessing and no-adherence profiles. These profiles also varied as a function of age. These results will be discussed, taking into account a generational effect hypothesis, with regard to the tendency/lack of tendency for teachers to stimulate the learning of different components of academic writing (norms, methods and reflexive practices).</p></div> 2019-12-17T04:26:46-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/535 The disrupted workplace: are the digital and group skills needs of employers being addressed by universities? 2021-03-03T13:03:07-08:00 Pauline A M Bremner p.bremner@rgu.ac.uk Audrey Laing a.laing@rgu.ac.uk <p>Upskilling moves quickly in today’s ‘disrupted’ workplace, and skill sets need to change to meet the needs of the digital economy (Gray, 2016), sometimes referred to as the fourth industrial revolution (4IR). Using a mixed methods approach and drawing on data from relevant stakeholders, the aim of this research is to explore, evaluate and identify any mismatch between degree learning outcomes and employability skills. The research also proposes specific strategies to address identifiable skills gaps. Focusing on the views of Fashion Management (FM) alumni, the study highlights gaps in digital skills as well as gaps in professional /group skills which some alumni felt were missing from their university education. The research also notes the importance of digital skills in the workplace from the employers’ point of view. This strengthens the argument for employers and universities to work more symbiotically to address any gaps between degree outcomes and employability skills in order to provide graduates who are ‘work ready’ for 4IR.</p><p>Given the findings, the authors recommend that the data gathered be used not only to inform and enhance our FM degree, but perhaps more importantly, and in a broader educational and academic context, that universities be mindful that they fully address the changing skills requirements of future employers. While this research focuses on FM alumni and employers, because of the creativity and management which are core to this course, the findings are relevant across many related management and creative industries university courses.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:41-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/540 Investigating impact: Exploring the effect of ‘open’ support on student success 2021-03-03T13:03:41-08:00 Jennie Rose Steres Blake jennie.blake@manchester.ac.uk Nicola Grayson jennie.blake@manchester.ac.uk Sami Karamalla-Gaiballa jennie.blake@manchester.ac.uk Traditional investigations into the impact of skills support on student success tend to focus on embedded or curriculum linked modes of delivery. The subject of this investigation concerns a study of the impact of ‘open’ support delivered through the University of Manchester library’s My Learning Essentials skills programme (MLE). MLE is a blended service providing both face-to-face and online support through two dominant pathways: one which is embedded in the curriculum and one which is ‘open to all’ regardless of degree programme or level of study. The ‘open’ nature of this type of support and the variety amongst the student population who engage with it means that measuring the impact on areas such as attainment has always been difficult. This article will present the results of a small study that investigated a specific cohort of undergraduate students in order to assess whether connections could be drawn between attendance at MLE ‘open’ workshops and degree classification. Although the cohort investigated was quite small, there is evidence of significant positive impact on student attainment as a result of engagement with the MLE programme. The data was run through a regression analysis that controlled for factors that could influence attainment and compared attendees of MLE open workshops with those who did not attend. Beyond the results of the regression analysis the study reveals interesting data around student uptake of MLE as a service and presents the methodology used, the results gained, and the lessons learned throughout the process. 2019-12-17T04:26:38-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/490 An exploration of taught master’s student perceptions of UK dissertation supervision 2021-03-03T13:04:10-08:00 Stephanos Anastasiadis stephanos.anastasiadis@gmail.com Justin O'Brien justin.obrien@royalholloway.ac.uk <p class="Abstract">This paper presents the results of an investigation into taught master’s students’ expectations and experience of being supervised during their final project. It does so using exploratory survey and focus group data from one UK institution with a high proportion of international students. The paper adds to the limited literature on master’s students’ experience, and makes two further main contributions. It finds that students both expect supervisor engagement and respond well to it, and argues that focusing on key elements of the dyadic supervision process can disproportionately improve student’s overall learning and satisfaction. In addition to furthering knowledge in this area, the research suggests numerous practical implications and lines of potential future inquiry.</p> 2019-12-17T04:26:35-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/570 Editorial 2021-03-03T13:04:42-08:00 Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk 2019-12-17T04:26:34-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/551 Associations in collaboration: how the first BALEAP and ALDinHE joint one-day conference came about 2021-03-03T13:05:09-08:00 Steve Briggs stevebriggs82@hotmail.com Mick Kavanagh mckava@essex.ac.uk <p>In this article, we outline the thinking leading up to a collaborative event, shared by two professional associations. The event is briefly described, but our main aim here is to encourage colleagues not only to attend such gatherings, but also to seriously consider holding a similar event. </p> 2019-11-29T05:48:45-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/538 Partners in a changing dance: embedding academic literacies in unit and course curricula 2021-03-03T13:05:36-08:00 Linda Carol Thies linda.thies@deakin.edu.au Viola Rosario viola.rosario@deakin.edu.au This paper presents a two-part case study that used the seminal Lea and Street (1998) paper on academic literacies to inform ways of working collaboratively with a range of partners on embedding the development of academic literacies in course curricula. The two projects that make up the case study were funded by an Australian Government response to a greater linguistic, social and cultural diversity of students enrolling in Australian universities (Australian Commonwealth Government, 2009a). Both projects focused on the development of curricula in selected professional courses in order to increase students’ awareness of the requirements of their chosen discipline, and ensure that they acquire the academic literacies needed to succeed in their area of study. What differed is the combinations of project partners and the nature of the partnerships. The case study presents the collaborative work of numerous project partners including Language and Learning Advisers (LLAs) and Subject Lecturers (SLs) in first identifying and defining academic literacies relevant to each course, and then implementing different teaching and learning practices to integrate the development of academic literacies in course curricula. Using the analogy of an ever-changing dance, the paper suggests that the degree of success and the sustainability of curriculum renewal projects depends on numerous interrelated factors, and that it may not be possible to enact academic literacy development by following set dance steps. Awareness, sensitivity and flexibility are important in bringing the dance to life. 2019-11-29T05:48:43-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/502 The trouble with academic reading: exposing hidden threshold concepts through academic reading retreats 2021-03-03T13:06:03-08:00 Angela Rhead a.rhead@keele.ac.uk <p>Acknowledged as a troublesome threshold concept for students and teachers alike in higher education (HE), academic reading persists as a significant yet under-investigated challenge. This paper introduces an exciting teaching innovation launched in 2017 at Keele University to meet that challenge: academic reading retreats. Adapting a writing retreat format, they deliver a range of strategies for reading journal articles and provide opportunities for private practice and shared reflections, which can facilitate deep learning about complex epistemological concepts. They open a dialogue within the academic community that helps students better understand the relationship between reading and enquiry, and helps academics better understand their students’ reading challenges. This case study provides a brief literature review and personal reflections about facilitating student reading, an introduction to our academic reading retreats and a preliminary evaluation of their potential. It concludes with a recommendation for extended time and space for academics and students to explore academic reading together, alongside an acknowledgement of the challenges that entails.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:42-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/539 Creating an academic literacy framework to enhance collaboration between learning developers and subject academics 2021-03-03T13:06:39-08:00 Rosella D'Alesio r.dalesio@swansea.ac.uk Ben Martin b.martin@swansea.ac.uk <p>As learning developers, we are constantly engaging with subject lecturers to discuss the learning needs of our students. This case study describes the creation of an academic literacy framework designed to engage subject lecturers and improve collaboration between them and the learning development team in order to develop the academic skills of students. Our aim was to create a tool that would achieve three complementary goals:</p><ul><li>Help subject lecturers pinpoint where their students are placed along a spectrum of skills.</li><li>Allow lecturers to request, and/or learning developers to recommend, skills sessions at the most appropriate time.</li><li>Allow the learning development team to identify gaps in provision.</li></ul><p>We used our experience as learning developers together with existing frameworks and schema to create a generic academic literacy framework for all disciplines. Because we perceived the HE level descriptors to be unsuitable for our needs, we aimed to create a framework that was not tied to specific levels. Once the framework was drafted, it was shared with other learning developers and subject academics to assess its suitability. This process provided results that confirmed we were moving towards an overall consensus and that the framework was fit for purpose.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:40-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/553 Positioning an academic literacies framework in an EAP context: case study of a university Pre-sessional course 2021-03-03T13:07:20-08:00 Paul Breen paulbbreen@hotmail.com <p>Historically, there has been a strong element of crossover between English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and academic literacies approaches, as originally conceptualised by Lea and Street (1998). However, a recurring cause of concern for the latter has been its perceived lack of focus on pedagogy, with greater emphasis on construction of text (Lea, 2004). Lillis (2003) highlights another concern being the lack of ‘a design frame’ (Kress, 2000) which can harness synergy between theory and practice. As such, the strength of academic literacy from a theoretical perspective can simultaneously be an Achilles heel in its practical pedagogic application. Consequently, examples of sustained academic literacies approaches in practice are rare. This paper thus argues for EAP acting as a fulcrum between theory and practice and provides one instance of enacting academic literacies approaches in the practical context of a Pre-sessional course in a post-92 university. Therein academic literacies approaches have shaped the design and delivery of an EAP curriculum. Through presenting a case study of this story, I hope to provide one ‘exemplar’ (Shulman, 1986) of integrating pedagogic practice and theory to serve as a model for the future. In doing so, academic literacies can better meet both the practical and theoretical demands of 21<sup>st</sup> century teaching, learning and educational development. </p> 2019-11-29T05:48:38-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/552 Pedagogical applications of academic literacies theory: a reflection and case study 2021-03-03T13:07:53-08:00 John Wrigglesworth j.wrigglesworth@shu.ac.uk <p>The development of the academic literacies approach has provided learning developers with a range of powerful tools to help all students to progress through higher education. Twenty years ago, Lea and Street’s (1998) report on student writing initiated a debate which encouraged the transformation of writing pedagogy in UK higher education. The goal of the transformation was, and remains, to develop an education system which is expanding, inclusive and accessible.</p><p>This paper focuses on the use of the meaning-making resources that students bring to their learning journey and the ones they encounter throughout their study. It outlines the documentation that enacts the rules that govern university practice at task, module, course and institutional level. The paper draws on academic literacies tools to help to clear away misunderstandings about students’ use of language. It then outlines Lea and Street’s (1998) classification of institutional approaches to the pedagogical challenges of improving student writing.</p><p>The case study describes an optional credit-bearing Introduction to Academic Language module on a UK degree course. By conducting a series of analytical tasks, the undergraduates who elected to take the module developed their use of aspects of academic writing including genre, argument and intertextuality. Students were assessed by analysing their own assessment scripts from other disciplinary modules. The academic writing module was evaluated in ways that could evidence recommendations for change at multiple levels. The methods of evaluation follow practices regarded as standard in many university quality processes but were used to transform provision along inclusive, academic literacies lines.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:36-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/529 The appearance of voice: EAP and academic literacies approaches to teaching reflective writing 2021-03-03T13:08:29-08:00 Simon A. Williams s.a.williams@sussex.ac.uk <p>The increasingly common requirement for higher education courses to include reflective writing as part of assessment practices places additional demands on novice writers. Complex and self-referential assessment criteria mean that students on foundation and pre-sessional courses in particular find it hard to decode and match descriptors, and to balance subjectivity and critical analysis. English for Academic Purposes (EAP), the most widely adopted approach to teaching academic writing in higher education, prioritises objectivity, and teaches students to recognise generic patterns of text organisation – though it seldom includes reflective writing itself as a genre. In contrast, the less familiar teaching approach of academic literacies explores students’ subjectivity, more obviously relevant to reflection, often through the development of an authentic narrative voice. As in other forms of academic writing, voice in reflective writing can be seen as a construct. It conveys a <em>persona</em> via the narrative, and an <em>ethos</em> via its specialised content. However, unlike other forms of academic writing, the <em>persona</em>in reflective writing must simultaneously communicate the author’s private and public self.</p><p><br />With the purpose of developing students’ <em>persona</em>, an academic literacies intervention in two transition courses invited students to complete a piece of timed writing in response to an autobiographical prompt. Compared with the EAP writing produced by the same student cohorts, the autobiographical writing contained a clear <em>persona</em> and consistent <em>ethos.</em> The assessed reflective writing later produced by the same students showed little change, however, particularly in its handling of <em>ethos</em>. The findings suggest that teachers of reflective writing need simultaneously to develop students’ ability to communicate a credible <em>persona</em> and to handle a specialised <em>ethos</em> of formal academic content. A more principled combination of the two approaches, EAP and academic literacies, could best provide the optimum learning environment for novice student writers to develop a balanced voice and achieve reflective writing fluency</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:34-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/554 Textography as a needs analysis and research tool for English for Academic Purposes and learning development practitioners 2021-03-03T13:08:56-08:00 Jennifer Sizer jennifer.sizer@port.ac.uk <p>The purpose of this paper to introduce textography as a useful method for English for academic purposes (EAP) and learning development (LD) practitioners to fill gaps in subject-specific knowledge and understanding. Textography is a research method that may be new to many practitioners. Textography combines textual analysis, usually associated with EAP, and ethnographic methods, often associated with LD, to investigate contexts, texts and practices. EAP and LD practitioners can use textography with accessible texts as initial needs analysis before reviewing literature or as a more in-depth, long-term research tool.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:32-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/542 “What kind of paper do you want from us?”: developing genre knowledge in one Kazakhstani university postgraduate school 2021-03-03T13:09:23-08:00 Philip Montgomery dpmontgomery@gmail.com Jason Sparks jason.sparks@nu.edu.kz Bridget Goodman bridget.goodman@nu.edu.kz <p>Drawing on the Academic Literacies perspectives of Lea and Street and key genre theorists, this mixed-methods case study explored multilingual student experiences of academic literacy practices in one postgraduate social-science school in an English-medium university in Kazakhstan. Two questions guided the research: (1) To what extent and in what ways do students develop genre knowledge in their school EMI contexts?; (2) Which pedagogical approaches and strategies do students identify as beneficial in supporting genre knowledge development? The study found students developed genre awareness for research-related literacy practices, involving field-, tenor- and mode-related genre knowledge. The study also found student capacity to apply genre knowledge successfully across a range of text genres. Another finding was that challenge and success in genre knowledge development was a function of the extent of explicit feedback from instructors and peers and explicit assignment expectations. Each of our findings are consistent with the critique and recommendations of Lea and Street (1998; 2006) on the importance of a situated approach to developing student academic literacy practice that accounts for the larger institutional contexts and epistemological traditions in which those practices have meaning. These findings have important value for discussions and debates on student academic literacy learning and practice in higher education in Kazakhstan, across Central Asia and in other countries where policies for internationalization and research universities are rapidly transforming higher education literacy practice in the current era of globalization.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:30-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/512 Applying the ‘Social Turn’ in writing scholarship to perspectives on writing self-efficacy 2021-03-03T13:10:00-08:00 Kim M. Mitchell kmmitchell@rrc.ca Diana E. McMillan diana.mcmillan@umanitoba.ca Michelle M. Lobchuk michelle.lobchuk@umanitoba.ca The aim of this paper is to explore the fit between the cognitive concept of writing self-efficacy and a socially constructed epistemology of writing. Socially constructed perspectives on writing emphasise context and community and include academic literacies, rhetorical genre theory, and the writing across the curriculum movement. These perspectives have been prominent in theoretical discussions of writing since the 1980s. This paper argues that the measurement of writing self-efficacy has continued to prioritise assessing writing self-efficacy as ability to successfully accomplish superficial writing product and process features, while the social context of writing and its resultant impacts on the identity forming, relational, emotional and creative impacts on writing self-efficacy have been largely ignored. The historical context of paradigmatic shifts in writing theory will be discussed with a lens towards proposing a synthesis of three constructionist situated perspectives - activity theory, rhetorical genre theory, and communities of practice - and how these situated perspectives may inform a more complete view of how writing self-efficacy should be assessed and measured. How practitioners may consider the merger of these theories in writing pedagogy will be introduced to inspire future research. 2019-11-29T05:48:28-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/526 What we talk about when we talk about writing: exploring how English for Academic Purposes teachers and learning developers conceptualise academic writing 2021-03-03T13:10:34-08:00 Sharon McCulloch smcculloch2@uclan.ac.uk Tania Horak thorak@uclan.ac.uk <p>Two main groups of staff currently provide writing support to students in British universities. These staff typically enter their roles from a range of professional backgrounds and, consequently, may hold different professional identities and understandings of what academic writing is. Although there is a body of research on teacher identity and on lecturers’ conceptualisations of writing, few studies have compared the views and identities of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers and learning developers. The current study set out to investigate whether these two groups perceive academic writing in similar or different ways, and why. </p><p>We undertook a small-scale study, interviewing eight participants at two universities, half from a post-1992 institution and the others from a research-intensive, high-ranking university. While participants varied in their definitions of writing, common themes emerged, lying on a spectrum from an autonomous, text-based, to an academic literacies perspective on writing. To establish the influences on these perspectives, we investigated the participants’ sense of identity as an academic writer, how they learned writing themselves and any influences on them from theory. Neither the EAP teachers nor the learning developers identified strongly as academic writers, despite all holding postgraduate qualifications and some having published their writing. Most reported little to no training in how to write academically themselves, and few mentioned any theoretical stance in their approach to helping students. Although some clustering around particular conceptualisations of writing was observed, we did not find strong evidence that the participants belong to two different ‘tribes’.<strong></strong></p> 2019-11-29T05:48:26-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/521 Knowledge making practices as vehicles for teaching academic literacy 2021-03-04T12:54:40-08:00 Bente Kristiansen bentek@tdm.au.dk <p>Several studies have established a connection between how a discipline communicates in texts and how disciplinary knowledge is produced (e.g. Bazerman, 2000; Blåsjö, 2004; Carter, 2007). This article suggests that a didactic consequence of such a connection could be to use the rhetorical contexts and the knowledge-making practices as vehicles for teaching academic literacy. A conceptual framework for doing this in practice is presented, including teaching and learning activities.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:25-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/536 Brokering academic literacies in a community of practice 2021-03-03T13:12:21-08:00 Lynne Gornall lgornall@uclan.ac.uk <p>This paper examines the ‘academic literacies’ approach to supporting postgraduate international students in the business school of a post-92 English university. The support service was evaluated with appreciative inquiry methods, consulting students and academics. The most helpful support, according to students and academics, came from the ‘academic literacies’ approach, which was enhanced, and enabled, because it was linked to two other ideas: communities of practice, and the learning developer as a broker.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:23-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/500 It’s learning development, Jim - but not as we know it: academic literacies in third-space 2021-03-03T13:12:51-08:00 Sandra Abegglen sabegglen@gmail.com Tom Burns t.burns@londonmet.ac.uk Sandra Sinfield s.sinfield@londonmet.ac.uk This paper maps our experience of conceptualising and teaching an interdisciplinary first-year undergraduate ‘Higher Education Orientation’ module against the seminal paper written by Lea and Street in 1998. We argue for third spaces within the curriculum and for practices that re-imagine what education is and what the university could be. 2019-11-29T05:48:21-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/566 Achieving transformation through collaboration: the role of academic literacies 2021-03-03T13:13:29-08:00 Ursula Wingate ursula.wingate@kcl.ac.uk <h1>The academic literacies model has been transformative in the sense that it offered a new perspective for research into students' writing as well as pedagogic principles that have influenced writing practitioners in many contexts. In this paper I discuss why a more wide-ranging transformation is needed to provide adequate academic literacy support to all students. This transformation would entail the integration of academic literacy instruction into study programmes, delivered as part of subject lecturers’ regular teaching and assessment practices. This would require collaboration between writing/learning development practitioners and subject lecturers, which in turn would need to be facilitated by changes in institutional policies and practices. I argue that the academic literacies model provides both the rationale and the principles for this kind of transformation.</h1> 2019-11-29T05:48:20-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/565 ‘Academic literacies’: sustaining a critical space on writing in academia 2021-03-03T13:14:14-08:00 Theresa Lillis theresa.lillis@open.ac.uk <p>In this paper, I briefly track the emergence and foci of academic literacies as a field of inquiry, summarising its contributions to understandings about writing and meaning making in academia. Writing from my specific geohistorical location in the UK, I foreground the importance of early key works that encapsulated concerns about deficit orientations to students’ language and literacy practices (e.g. Ivanič, 1998; Lea and Street,1998). I also underline the transnational dimension to the development of academic literacies which has helped drive forward intellectual debates about the relationship between academic language and literacy practices, and participation in academia. I argue that academic literacies provides an important space for critically exploring what are often taken-for-granted assumptions about the nature and value of academic writing conventions, and the ways these (both assumptions and conventions) impact on opportunities for participation in knowledge making. This critical thinking space continues to serve as an intellectual resource for researchers, teachers and students in contemporary neo-liberal higher education, where regimes of evaluation are super-normative, even in (or because of) a context of super-diversity, that is increased mobility of peoples and semiotic practices. Academic literacies as praxis necessarily involves straddling both normative and transformative orientations (Lillis and Scott, 2007) or what Hall (1992) refers to as the ‘academic’ and ‘intellectual’ dimensions to academia.</p><p><strong> </strong></p> 2019-11-29T05:48:18-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/567 Academic literacies twenty years on: a community-sourced literature review 2021-03-03T13:14:53-08:00 John Hilsdon john.hilsdon@plymouth.ac.uk Cathy Malone C.Malone@shu.ac.uk Alicja Syska alicja.syska@plymouth.ac.uk <p>In 1998, the paper ‘Student writing in higher education: an academic literacies approach’ by Mary Lea and Brian Street reinvigorated debate concerning ‘what it means to be academically literate’ (1998, p.158). It proposed a new way of examining how students learn at university and introduced the term ‘academic literacies’. Subsequently, a body of literature has emerged reflecting the significant theoretical and practical impact Lea and Street’s paper has had on a range of academic and professional fields. This literature review covers articles selected by colleagues in our professional communities of the Association for Learning Development in Higher Education (ALDinHE), the association for lecturers in English for Academic Purposes (BALEAP), and the European Association of Teachers of Academic Writing (EATAW). As a community-sourced literature review, this text brings together reviews of wide range of texts and a diverse range of voices reflecting a multiplicity of perspectives and understandings of academic literacies. We have organised the material according to the themes: Modality, Identity, Focus on text, Implications for research, and Implications for practice. We conclude with observations relevant to these themes, which we hope will stimulate further debate, research and professional collaborations between our members and subscribers.</p> 2019-11-29T05:48:15-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/569 Editorial 2021-03-03T13:15:37-08:00 John Hilsdon john.hilsdon@plymouth.ac.uk 2019-11-29T05:48:14-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/499 Academic Success: a student’s guide to studying at university 2021-03-03T13:16:03-08:00 Karen Hudson Karen.hudson@essex.ac.uk <p>Aimed at students with limited experience of the culture and conventions of English-speaking universities, this book introduces readers to a wide range of academic communicative practices. It assumes no prior knowledge or experience of the (mostly) unwritten behaviours, attitudes and values required for academic success and provides a comprehensive breakdown of these, clarified throughout with examples, explanations and practical guidance.</p><p>The book’s scope is broad, rather than deep, and therefore represents a useful and pragmatic introductory text for any student preparing for a transition or return to higher education. The text is underpinned throughout by two recurring themes that are directly transferable into LD practice. The idea that academic knowledge is developed and communicated via debate and argument is directly linked to the notion of ‘academic apprenticeship’ in which students are encouraged to begin participation in active and current disciplinary discourse. </p><p> </p> 2019-04-10T02:24:35-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/458 Students’ perceptions of the learner attributes required for (and resulting from) heutagogical learning 2021-03-03T13:16:30-08:00 John Stoszkowski JRStoszkowski@uclan.ac.uk Liam McCarthy liam.mccarthy@stmarys.ac.uk <p>Heutagogy, a form of self-determined learning, is a learner-centred approach to learning and teaching, grounded in constructivist principles. This case study explores final year undergraduate students’ perceptions of the learner attributes required for (and resulting from) heutagogical learning. As part of a larger research study, data were collected at two UK universities, using an online survey that was intended to elicit their perceptions and experiences of a module designed using heutagogical principles. Results indicate that foundational knowledge, skills and attitude are a requirement for, and an outcome of, heutagogical learning. Potential implications for the use of heutagogical approaches to learning and teaching are discussed.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:34-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/475 Walking the path of desire: evaluating a blended learning approach to developing study skills in a multi-disciplinary group 2021-03-03T13:17:17-08:00 Michelle Crowther michelle.crowther1@canterbury.ac.uk This case study describes the methods used to evaluate a series of study skills workshops and online learning materials created for a cohort of foundation degree arts and humanities students. The workshops and online content were created in response to feedback from the previous cohort which revealed that students had struggled to relate the workshops to their assignment, which was a portfolio of critical reflections. In order to better understand the disconnect experienced by the students between the module content and the course assessment, it was decided to track the paths of desire taken by the cohort in their learning, and assess whether online content could improve learning outcomes or whether workshops and print sources are more valuable for skills development. Quantitative data, such as attendance, VLE use and book loans, along with qualitative data from the students’ critical reflections were gathered to track student engagement with material, creating a narrative of the learning journeys of the cohort. Findings revealed that online content has a valuable role in supporting success for some students but that attendance at workshops has a strong correlation with portfolio grade and skills development. 2019-04-10T02:24:33-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/467 Unrolling the text: Using scrolls to facilitate academic reading 2021-03-03T13:17:56-08:00 Sandra Abegglen s.abegglen@londonmet.ac.uk Tom Burns t.burns@londonmet.ac.uk Dave Middlebrook dmiddlebrook@textmapping.org Sandra Sinfield s.sinfield@londonmet.ac.uk <p>This case study shows how we have used textscrolls to address academic reading in our Facilitating Student Learning postgraduate module. We outline how we explored with staff the potential of the textscroll to offer a more welcoming, accessible, collaborative and dialogic encounter with reading than the codex (bound book or article). Drawing briefly on a literature review commissioned when part of the LearnHigher Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, we consider reading not just as a semantic or linguistic activity but as a socio-political one, especially for those, like our students, who are typically placed as educational outsiders. We harness the work of Dave Middlebrook (one of our co-authors) and his discussion of the power relations of the bound text and the liberatory potential of the unrolled textscroll. We conclude with an example of what happened when one of our staff participants took scrolls back to her third year Design students, and we argue that utilising emancipatory teaching practices can make higher education more inclusive.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:32-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/456 Increasing diversity in peer-to-peer education: A case study of manager experiences with student paraprofessionals in learning development in the Canadian context 2021-03-03T13:18:25-08:00 Jenna Olender jolender@wlu.ca Michael Lisetto-Smith mlisettosmith@wlu.ca <p>This autoethnographic case study examines the experience of managers with hiring student paraprofessionals into various roles within peer-to-peer education models and programmes as a method to increase the diversity in learning development services in the Canadian context. Tailoring learning development through peer-to-peer education models for diverse student groups is an important aspect of how learning development supports students in higher education. Including the knowledge and perspectives of student paraprofessionals who better reflect the diversity of the population we serve has been an important aspect of our practice. Our purpose for this case study is to better understand how our experiences with paraprofessional staff diversity, over a seven-year period (2010-2017), have influenced our practice of learning development in an institutional context focussed on creating a more inclusive and welcoming environment on campus to better support the needs of diverse learners. The knowledge that we gained through this analysis of diversity and peer learning as an approach to learning development may serve as an example of the value of autoethnography as a method to provide useful insight to professionals and leaders in the field.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:31-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/466 The LEAP (Learning Excellence Achievement Pathway) framework: A model for student learning development in higher education 2021-03-03T13:18:54-08:00 Emily McIntosh e.mcintosh@bolton.ac.uk Mary Barden m.e.barden@bolton.ac.uk <p>This article explores the development of the LEAP (Learning Excellence Achievement Pathway) framework at the University of Bolton, UK. It describes the nature of the project and focuses on the methodology involved in conducting an institution-wide audit of student learning development (LD) provision and producing a visual framework to stimulate a culture of LD within the organisation. Whilst most UK universities offer a student LD programme at undergraduate level, little work has been undertaken to develop and define a visual framework which underpins these programmes and assists students to conceptualise their progress. This paper explores the context for creating an LD framework and outlines how LD provision is mapped to align curricular LD opportunities with co-curricular student engagement initiatives. The article then considers the implementation of the LEAP framework. A mixed-methods evaluation activity was conducted, involving both staff and students, using a variety of data. Evaluation methods were used to assess the impact of the framework on student LD, revealing a number of positive changes to their LD behaviour and habits, their assessment of LD, the accessibility of help and support and their awareness of the context in which LD takes place. Finally, we identify future developments to the framework to embed it further within the institution.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:29-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/477 A Participatory Action Research study on the impact of Peer Assisted Student Support (PASS) and Supplemental Instruction (SI) by international PhD students 2021-03-03T13:19:30-08:00 Catherine Hayes catherine.hayes@sunderland.ac.uk John Anthony Fulton john.fulton@sunderland.ac.uk <p><br />Using a Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach, this evaluative research study gives an insight into the implementation of a pilot study of a newly implemented Peer Assisted Student Support (PASS) and Supplemental Instruction (SI) Programme. The focus of the study involved six postgraduate PhD students delivering a PASS/SI scheme to cohorts of MSc Public Health, MSc Nursing and MSc Psychosis and Complex Mental Health Interventions students, all undertaking their final dissertations.The study was used to illuminate the degree to which PASS and SI were perceived to impact on the overall student experience as part of a quality enhancement initiative. Findings of the study revealed that the programme had positively impacted on both PASS/SI leaders and participants of the scheme, who reported increased confidence and an increased sense of social inclusion and belonging to the institution respectively. Being facilitated by students who had experienced the same academic pathway was perceived to have widened networking opportunities and to have positively impacted on the capacity of the participants and leaders to build relationships and prepare skills of direct relevance to the requirements of an employer such as teamwork and initiative.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:28-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/506 Editorial 2021-03-03T13:20:03-08:00 John Hilsdon john.hilsdon@plymouth.ac.uk 2019-04-10T02:24:26-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/489 Making use of students' digital habits in higher education: What they already know and what they learn 2021-03-03T13:20:42-08:00 Eva Hansson eva.hansson@hh.se Jeanette Sjöberg jeanette.sjoberg@hh.se <p>Varieties of digital practices have increasingly become part of people’s everyday lives and people, in general, use these communicative practices on a daily basis, mostly for social and entertaining purposes. As to higher education, researchers have pointed out that digital technology could be a useful tool in how to learn more effectively, if it is based on the abilities that students bring with them into higher education from their everyday life (for example, Buzzard et. al., 2011). In this case study, we explore the issue of students' digital practices in everyday life as well as in higher education, in a teacher training programme at a Swedish University. The aim is two-fold: on the one hand, to provide knowledge regarding students' everyday experiences of digital practices and the ways in which these are utilised in higher education; on the other hand, to contribute to the understanding of the ways in which higher education contributes to challenging and developing students' digital skills. Twenty-nine students from teacher training programmes participated in the study by answering a questionnaire. The results show that the students’ digital habits are not being used or acknowledged in higher education, except for when it comes to their Teacher Training Practice (TTP). Furthermore, the results also show that higher education contributes to students’ digital skills. This, we argue, could be of interest for teachers and researchers in teacher training programmes and for teachers in primary to tertiary education, in developing education activities with digital technology based on pupils’ and students’ digital habits. We can also see that the study can inspire other teachers in higher education, where the idea of using students’ digital habits perhaps is not yet taken into consideration.</p> 2019-04-10T02:24:26-07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/481 Book review: Success in academic writing, by Trevor Day 2021-03-04T12:55:08-08:00 Christopher Little c.w.r.little@keele.ac.uk <h1 dir="ltr">A book review of Day, T. (2018) <span style="font-size: 10px;">Success in academic writing. </span><span style="font-size: 10px;">London: Palgrave MacMillan.</span></h1> 2018-10-31T14:45:11-07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/464 A learner developer perspective: critiquing dominant practices and cultures within university spaces 2021-03-03T13:22:02-08:00 Sarah Parkes sarah.parkes@newman.ac.uk <p>This commentary reflects my evolving understanding of the problematic nature of identity and how this relates to notions of professional identity for those in learning development (LD) roles who engage with and produce research. If identity is, as Quinn (2010) asserts, boundary-less, and experienced as a perpetual becoming between multiplicities, what does this mean for questions of identity? This paper suggests that perpetual becoming is reflected in LD roles that operate within a third space, crossing or spanning the boundaries of traditional institutional sites of research, teaching or services, administration or knowledge transfer (Whitchurch, 2013). From such a place, LD practitioners can become what Ball (2007) calls cultural critics, who through their experiences and knowledge of the variety of institutional practices and cultures, are in an enviable place to critique them.</p><p>LD practitioners need to maintain a dialogical position that enables reflection-in-action (Schön, 2001) to understand and respond to the multiplicities present in competing individual, institutional and societal discourses. By way of an example, consider the contrast between the pervasive neo-liberal drive for quantification and performance, set against the complex and often messy realities (Biesta, 2010) of LD issues that we, along with our students, often experience.</p><p>Learning developers cannot however ignore the current political and social contexts that represent the environment within which our work exists. Nonetheless, LD practitioners must maintain their access to, engagement with, and production of a disparate range of research from across varied institutional and sectoral domains that go beyond seeking evidence of effectiveness. Hence, the need for and purpose of LD practitioner research is to create knowledge-of-practice (Cochrane-Smith and Lytle, 1999) that generates ontological understanding of, and exposure to, the epistemological bases of LD practices.</p><p> </p> 2018-10-31T14:45:10-07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education https://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/article/view/460 Whose wellbeing is it anyway? 2021-03-03T13:22:30-08:00 Sunny Dhillon sunny.dhillon@bishopg.ac.uk <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 150%;">In this opinion piece, I suggest the need for a critical examination of the ‘wellbeing’ agenda currently being developed throughout Higher Education (HE) in the UK. I suggest that problems arise when notions of ‘wellbeing’ are used without being sufficiently well-defined, and are then accepted as the barometer of student health. This approach will be elucidated by contextualising the situation students find themselves in contemporary neoliberal universities; situating the crucial intermediary role that learning developers and student support services fulfil between academics and students; and exploring different modes of engagement available to those in these roles. Drawing upon the critical pedagogy of Biesta (2013), I argue that the remit of cultivating critical thinking and independent study skills means that learning developers, through one-to-one meetings, may sometimes be as well-placed as those with specific wellbeing roles (such as counsellors or mental health workers) to acknowledge and explore students’ personal and social anxieties and concerns with compassion. This approach may seem to be at odds with wellbeing rhetoric, which, I argue, can act to detract from critical engagement with the explicit challenges facing students in the contemporary socio-political milieu. My aim is therefore to reintroduce the notion of criticality within the discussions taking place among academics and professional support staff, which in turn may inform practice. Central to my aim in this is to raise broader questions around the primary role of academics and professionals in HE; for example, is it to train students to passively ‘fit in’ within society or to educate them in a manner such that they will act agentively in society?</p> 2018-10-31T14:45:09-07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education